New E-Books

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The book titles listed below have recently been added to the Library’s growing collection of electronic books. Click on a linked book title below to browse a table of contents or to read the full-text. A more comprehensive list of e-books available can be found on the Library’s E-Books page. Do you want to recommend the purchase of a book for the Library’s collection? You can submit your requests by using our online Purchase Recommendation form.

Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine
Braddom’s Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Campbell’s Core Orthopaedic Procedures
Cardiovascular Intervention: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease
Clinical Dermatology
Clinical Radiation Oncology
Current Therapy of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
Dorland’s Dictionary of Medical Acronyms and Abbreviations
Evaluation of Health Care Quality in Advanced Practice Nursing
Evidence-Based Practice of Critical Care, 2nd Edition
Kanski’s Clinical Ophthalmology:A Systematic Approach, 8th edition
McDonald and Avery’s Dentistry for the Child and Adolescent
Medical Terminology Systems: A Body Systems Approach
Memory Loss, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia: A Practical Guide for Clinicians
Murray & Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine
Netter’s Atlas of Neuroscience, 3rd edition
Netter’s Orthopaedic Clinical Examination, 3rd edition
Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
Otologic Surgery
Principles and Practice of Laser Dentistry
Principles and Practice of Lymphedema Surgery
Scholarly Inquiry and the DNP Capstone
The Doctor Of Nursing Practice
Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, 13th edition

From the Library Director: Looking Forward

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_DSC7569-01-3Best wishes to everyone for 2016!  I like to say (frequently) that this Library is a “forward looking” library.  That is not to say that what we have done in the past or what we are currently doing is wrong or poorly done.  Quite the contrary.  However, as all of us know, we live in a time of tremendous change and libraries are not immune.

I recently viewed this video about IBM Watson (see below).  One of the functions of IBM Watson is to ingest the scholarly medical literature on a particular subject, for example oncology, and be able to synthesize this knowledge and make recommendations for clinical care.  The creators of IBM Watson are quick to point out that human judgement is still essential especially in the final decision making but the laborious literature searching and analysis can be done through machine learning.

Medical libraries have traditionally served in the role of hosting or housing the medical literature and in many cases assisting with searching and finding information.  What if IBM Watson (or something like that) provides this service?  I say that is a good thing, as it would be applying efficiencies and quality measures where they can do the most good.

There are many opportunities for libraries to contribute both upstream and downstream in the research process.  With knowledge being born and essentially living digital, with no print format in some cases, there are many challenges to be solved.  How does one transform collected data into a format that can be used?  How can it be stored and made available for reproducibility or reuse?

Similarly, how is data stored for perpetuity?  How can data be visualized, shared or combined with additional data so that it can be meaningful and lead to innovative discoveries and conclusions?  What are the best practices and how do people learn about them?  These are all traditional library functions now applied to the digital world where knowledge exist in formats beyond books and journals, even electronic books and journals.

Admittedly, this is not a transition for the faint hearted.  It requires constant reminders that libraries are in the knowledge industry and not just the book and journal business.  It requires the recognition that new skill sets are needed.  It requires a tolerance for the unknown and a willingness to take risks and learn from them.  It means that we look for partners and collaborators whose expertise and goals are complementary.  It means that instead of saying “no we don’t do that” we say “well let’s talk some more because maybe we can help.”  It means having the confidence that we can bring value to our organizations in their efforts to achieve their mission.  It is great time to be a librarian!

Why You Should Be Using a Citation Manager

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Citation managers (aka bibliographic managers, reference managers, or citation software) are tools that can help you more efficiently navigate the twists and turns of the research trail, whether that journey involves writing a term paper, putting together an article aimed at publication, or submitting a proposal as part of a grant application.

Because of their versatility, these tools are real time-savers, allowing a user to:

  • Import citations from article databases and websites
  • Manually enter unique references such as interviews and emails
  • Add notes and keyword tags to citations
  • Format references and build bibliographies via a word processor plug-in

Regardless of the program you use, most citation tools will allow you to export references from one program to another, facilitating the exchange of information between collaborators with different programs.

Choosing a tool ultimately depends on your personal workflow and needs. We are happy to assist  you in determining the best citation manager for those information needs or in answering any questions you may have  about citation management.  For assistance, please submit a consultation request.

Post contributed by Mike Wilson, CMHSL Information Services Specialist.

Radiology Video Filmed in Presentation Studio

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One of first projects that we filmed in the Health Sciences Library’s new Presentation Studio is this video highlighting the Spencer B. Gay Radiology International Education Program, which is designed for second to fourth year residents interested in global health initiatives.  The video is also targeted to prospective donors.

Our Presentation Studio has a green screen, a BlackMagic cinema camera, and lighting to create professional looking videos.  To reserve the room, please use our consultation request form.  For questions or for more details, please email Stephanie Fielding at sna9e@virginia.edu.

Post contributed by Stephanie Fielding, CMHSL Technology in Education Consulting Specialist.

Featured EBook: Wearable Sensors

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Wearable Sensors covers a wide variety of topics associated with the development and application of various wearable sensors. It also provides an overview and coherent summary of many aspects of current wearable sensor technology. Both industry professionals and academic researchers will benefit from this comprehensive reference which contains the most up-to-date information on the advancement of lightweight hardware, energy harvesting, signal processing, and wireless communications and network.

Wearable Sensors covers a wide variety of topics associated with the development and application of various wearable sensors. It also provides an overview and coherent summary of many aspects of current wearable sensor technology. Both industry professionals and academic researchers will benefit from this comprehensive reference which contains the most up-to-date information on the advancement of lightweight hardware, energy harvesting, signal processing, and wireless communications and network.

CMHSL Holiday Hours

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After-hours Space
Whenever the library is closed, our large after-hours space, with computers and study rooms, is open to anyone with a valid UVA Health System ID.

Holiday Hours
Monday, December 21: 7:30am-5pm
Tuesday, December 22: 7:30am-5pm
Wednesday, December 23: 7:30am-5pm
Thursday, December 24: Closed
Friday, December 25: Closed
Saturday, December 26: 9am-5pm
Sunday, December 27: 12pm-5pm
Monday, December, 28: 7:30am-5pm
Tuesday, December 29: 7:30am-5pm
Wednesday, December 30: 7:30am-5pm
Thursday, December 31: 7:30am-5pm
Friday, January 1: Closed
Saturday, January 2: 9am-5pm
Sunday, January 3: Resume regular hours.

All of us at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library wish everyone a safe and enjoyable holiday season!

New E-Book Editions in ClinicalKey

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ClinicalKey has recently added a number of important new editions to its collection of over 1100 medical textbooks, including the 41st edition of Gray’s Anatomy.


Atlas of Pelvic Anatomy and Gynecologic Surgery
Autopsy Pathology: A Manual and Atlas
Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System
Breastfeeding: a Guide for the Medical Profession
Brenner and Rector’s the Kidney
Cardiac Imaging: the Requisites
Ciottone’s Disaster Medicine
Dorfman and Czerniak’s Bone Tumors
Gray’s Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice, 41st Edition
Hacker and Moore’s Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Hurwitz Clinical Pediatric Dermatology
Medical Genetics
Netter’s Essential Physiology
Neuromuscular Disorders of Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence
Pediatric Allergy: Principles and Practice
Physical Diagnosis of Pain: An Atlas of Signs and Symptoms
Principles and Practice of Lymphedema Surgery
Sabiston and Spencer’s Surgery of the Chest
Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management
Textbook of Interventional Cardiology
Thompson & Thompson Genetics in Medicine

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Remembering Joan Echtenkamp Klein

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Joan

Joan Echtenkamp Klein, Alvin V. & Nancy Baird Curator for Historical Collections, died suddenly at her home on December 2nd.

Joan spent most of her professional career here in the Library leading the Historical Collections and Services department. Joan first joined the Library in 1982, coming from the University of Virginia Special Collections department. Joan loved everything about the history of the health sciences and created a vision that made the department outstanding and a jewel of the Library.

The online exhibits produced under her direction are some of the Library’s most visited websites with visitors from around the world.  Through her partnerships with medical historians and bioethicists, the Library has been part of some major historical discussions such as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study.

Joan was extremely active in a number of professional organizations including the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference, the Archivists and Librarians in the History of the Health Sciences, and the Science, Technology and Healthcare Roundtable of the Society of American Archivists.

On a personal note, Joan will be missed here for her outgoing personality, her ready laugh and her enthusiasm for her work.

[Post contributed by Gretchen Arnold, Library Director.]

Services:

Joan Echtenkamp Klein passed away on December 2nd, 2015, at the age of 62.  Born in Schenectady, New York and raised in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Garden City, New York, she was the daughter of Harlan and Wilma (Walther) Echtenkamp, sister of Paul and John.  A graduate of Gettysburg College and the Catholic University of America, in 1982, she became the curator of historical collections at the University of Virginia’s Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, where she built a renowned program. She was a consummate professional, a mentor to many, and fan of the University of Virginia’s basketball and baseball teams.  In 1996, she was invited to the White House for her work on the Tuskegee Syphilis Study Legacy Committee, and in 2003 she received the Society of American Archivists’ Waldo Gifford Leland Award for digitizing the Walter Reed Collection.  She read widely, loved music, and had a distinctive infectious laugh. Joan is survived by her family and her husband of 26 years, Mike.

Visitation will be at 1 PM on Saturday, December 19th at Bliley’s Funeral Home 3801 Augusta Avenue, Richmond followed by a memorial service at 2 PM.  

In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts in honor of Joan can be sent to:

UVA Health Foundation
In Memory of Joan Echtenkamp Klein
P.O Box 400807
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4807

Calculate This!

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[Post contributed by Karen Knight, CMHSL Medical Education Librarian.]

Clinicians often need to perform rapid and complex calculations when making clinical decisions, as in the case when determining the probability of a deep vein thrombosis or weighing the need to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia.

There are many proven and trusted medical calculators available and their usefulness is even greater when they appear as part of your information resource and streamline your work flow.  The Health Sciences Library subscribes to two products in particular that offer clinical calculators: Essential Evidence Plus and UptoDate.

Essential Evidence Plus

  • Select “Diagnostic Test Calculators” from the Home Screen to browse over 2,000 calculators arranged by subject.
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Click on image to enlarge.

  • Perform a subject search as in this example “Pneumonia” and select the calculators that are included.
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Click on image to enlarge.

UptoDate

  • Select “Calculators” from the Home Screen to browse calculators arranged by categories such as “Adult and Pediatric Emergency Medicine Calculators” or “General Surgery Calculators”.
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Click on image to enlarge.

  • Perform a subject search as in this example “Pulmonary Embolism” and select the calculator included in the left-side topic navigation pane.
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Click on image to enlarge.

Wilma Lynch Retires from CMHSL

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Gretchen Arnold, Library Director, and Wilma Lynch

Gretchen Arnold, Library Director, and Wilma Lynch

The Library said good-bye today to Wilma Lynch, Administrative Services Manager.  Wilma joined the library staff 18 years ago and oversaw renovations and other major changes.  Wilma is well-know across the Health System and has a gift for getting things done.  We all wish her many happy years ahead.