My Publisher wants my Data?!

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Ready to submit your article to your favorite journal? Don’t be surprised if the editor requires not only your manuscript, tables, and figures, but also your data. More and more, publishers require that you make the data related to your manuscript publically available upon publication of your article.

What’s going on? The desire to make scientific research more rigorous and reproducible has led to efforts to increase the availability of research data. Publishers such as PLOS and Nature have responded to this cause by developing policies around data availability. Their guidelines describe not only the requirements, e.g. “to make all data underlying the findings described in their manuscript fully available without restriction, with rare exception” (PLOS One), but also the steps authors must take to comply. These requirements are becoming more and more commonplace in author agreements.

Funders, too?!? Federal and private funders also often require data sharing. To ensure data availability at the conclusion of sponsored research, many funders require a data management or data sharing plan to be submitted with the grant application. Plans must typically address topics such as what data outputs will the research generate, when will the data be shared and where will the data be made available.

What do I do? If you need a data management plan for a grant, a data availability statement for a journal, are ready to share your data, or anywhere in between, your Health Sciences librarians are here to help. We have expertise in crafting these agreements and are knowledgeable about tools to help guide the process. In addition, when it comes time to make your data available, we can help guide you to repositories that are free and meet publisher and funder requirements, including UVA’s own Libra Data, a local instance of Dataverse (read more about Libra Data).

So when your publisher or your funder wants your data, contact HSL’s Research & Data Services at hslrdas@virginia.edu.  We’ll provide expert guidance, making the process efficient and complete.

New Exhibit: George Washington & Medicine

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GW_exhibitThe Claude Moore Health Sciences Library is currently hosting a new traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine. Every Necessary Care & Attention: George Washington & Medicine explores the role of medicine during the lifetime of first president, Revolutionary War general, and plantation owner, George Washington. The exhibit examines some of the health issues encountered in the course of organizing troops during the American Revolution and in the management of Washington’s Mt. Vernon estate. It also looks at the presence of medicine in Washington’s personal life, through events like the death of his half-brother from tuberculosis in 1752 and Washington’s own survival of several diseases including smallpox, dysentery, and malaria.

Accompanying the six exhibit banners from NLM are rare books and artifacts from the Health Sciences Library’s collections, selected by Historical Collections Specialist Emily Bowden. Featured items include a set of 19th century dental instruments, an 1827 printing of a Revolutionary War doctor’s journal, home health texts, and bloodletting instruments. Every Necessary Care & Attention: George Washington & Medicine will be on display in the front lobby of the Library from July 22, 2016 to September 2, 2016.

To learn more about the exhibit and to browse supplemental online content, visit the NLM Exhibition Program website. For more information, you can also contact Historical Collections & Services.

Introducing Resident 360 from the New England Journal of Medicine

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NEJMNEJM Resident 360, a new website and discussion platform from the New England Journal of Medicine, gives residents the information, resources, and support they need to approach each rotation with confidence. Rotation Prep helps residents solidify their foundational medical knowledge with materials that have been written and curated by a team of physician experts, fellows, and residents, and are mapped to 14 common residency rotations in internal medicine. Each rotation includes brief topic overviews, links to landmark trials, and review articles from the NEJM and other highly respected sources, as well as a selection of questions from the NEJM Knowledge+ service, a board review database.

Free access is available to all as a benefit of the UVa institutional subscription to the New England Journal of Medicine and can be accessed here: NEJM Resident 360

 

New E-Books

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9780323287807The newly published books listed below have recently been added to the Library’s collection of electronic books. Click on any linked title to browse a table of contents or to read the full-text. A more comprehensive list of health sciences e-books available can be found on the Library’s E-Books page. Do you want to recommend the purchase of a book for the Library’s collection? You can submit your requests via our online Purchase Recommendation form.

ASE’s Comprehensive Echocardiography, 2nd ed
Atlas of Head and Neck Pathology, 3rd ed
Autopsy Pathology: A Manual and Atlas, 3rd ed
Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System, 5th ed
Before We Are Born: Essentials of Embryology and Birth Defects
Clinical Radiation Oncology, 4th ed
Cohen’s Pathways of the Pulp, 11th ed
Dermatological Signs of Systemic Disease, 5th ed
Diagnosis and Treatment Planning in Dentistry
Evidence-Based Practice of Critical Care
Ferri’s Clinical Advisor 2017
Histology and Cell Biology: An Introduction to Pathology, 4th ed
Improvised Medicine: Providing Care in Extreme Environments
Kanski’s Clinical Ophthalmology, 8th ed
Learning Radiology: Recognizing the Basics, 3rd ed
Lichtman’s Atlas of Hematology 2016
Medical Microbiology, 8th ed
Mosby’s Pocket Guide to Fetal Monitoring
Neonatal Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice
Noyes’ Knee Disorders: Surgery, Rehabilitation, Clinical Outcomes
Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice
Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies
Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine
Williams Gynecology, 3rd ed

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Lactation Room Now Available

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The Library is pleased to announce its newly-designated lactation space. This is a private, lockable room in the Cabell Room and is available during regular library hours.  Those wishing to use the room should show their Health System ID at the Service Desk to check out the key. Thanks to Lactation Consultants Katie Heck and Diane Sampson for their assistance in preparing the space.   For more information, please email Kimberley Barker (Kimberley@virginia.edu) or contact the Service Desk at 434-924-5444.

You can also call the Service Desk in advance to see if the room is being used.

IPA Open House on April 12th

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The Library is excited to announce that the BioConnector is partnering with the University of Virginia Health System Cancer Center and the Office of Research Core Administration  to provide access to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). IPA is software that allows users to rapidly understand pathway involvement and change, effected biological processes, causal regulators and their directional effect on genes, and functions and diseases across multiple time points or doses.

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Intrigued? Then make plans to visit the Library during the IPA Open House on April 12th. This is your opportunity to learn more, to try IPA for free, and to learn about the subsidized pricing available to you through UVA.

There are several sessions from which to choose:

9:00-10:00- Sign up session; BioConnector ( lower level, Health Sciences Library)
Learn more about IPA, and sign up for an account.
Coffee & refreshments will be served.

10:00-noon- Introduction and hands-on training (Carter Classroom, Health Sciences Library)
*Registration is required for this session: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/node/38716

1:00-4:00- Drop-in session

We hope that you can join us.

Celebrating 40 years of service!

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On April 9, 1976, the opening of the new Health Sciences Library at the University of Virginia was celebrated at a dedication ceremony. This year on April 8, 2016, we recognize the Health Sciences Library’s 40th anniversary, marking four decades of service in the current library building.

 

Early images of the Health Sciences Library, clockwise from top left: concept drawing for the new Health Sciences Library, c. 1970; exterior of the HSL, c. 1976; students in the HSL, c. 1980; entrance to the renamed Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, 1981. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

Early images of the Health Sciences Library, clockwise from top left: concept drawing for the new Health Sciences Library, c. 1970; exterior of the HSL, c. 1976; students in the HSL, c. 1980; entrance to the renamed Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, 1981. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

 

The early history of the Health Sciences Library goes back to the very beginning of the University and a modest collection of medical, anatomical, and surgical texts, including 329 works selected by Thomas Jefferson. For nearly a century, medical books were kept with the rest of the library collection housed in the Rotunda. Unfortunately, most of these medical texts were destroyed during the 1895 Rotunda fire. As the Rotunda and the library collection were rebuilt in the years that followed, a new medical library of 7,000 books was acquired and housed in the basement of the Rotunda, separate from the rest of the collection.

In 1910, Abraham Flexner’s famous report on medical education in the United States and Canada commented that one of the primary deficiencies of the UVA medical program was the lack of an adequate medical library. Nearly two decades later, the construction of the new UVA medical school, which opened in 1929, met this need by allocating space for a designated medical library. However, the rapid expansion of the library’s collection of books and journals and the swift growth of both the School of Medicine and the University Hospital caused the library to outgrow its new space much sooner than expected. Beginning in the 1940s, storage limitations led many medical books and library materials to be stored in Alderman Library or in other offsite locations like the attic of Cabell Hall. A need for additional library space was becoming increasingly apparent, but the struggle to obtain the funds needed to develop and build a new library would stretch on for several more decades.

 

The Health Sciences Library in 1980 and 2006. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

The Health Sciences Library in 1980 and 2006. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

 

Finally in the early 1960s, generous donations by alumni, a grant from the National Institutes of Health, and state funding provided the necessary capital to launch a planning committee for the new library. Leading these efforts was Dr. Wilhelm Moll, director of the library from 1962 until his death in 1979. In recognition of Dr. Moll’s leadership and substantial contributions to the medical library, the Wilhelm Moll Rare Book and Medical History Room in Historical Collections was named in his honor.

Re-envisioned as the “Health Sciences Library,” the new facility designed under Dr. Moll’s supervision would bring together the medical collection and the nursing collection, which had been held in a separate nursing library in McKim Hall, and would adopt the mission to serve patrons from all areas of the health system. Project leaders hoped to select a site for the new library that would position it at the heart of the medical center complex, adjacent to education, research, and medical care facilities. An innovative design was proposed for a library building that would span Jefferson Park Avenue, serving as a “bridge” between health system buildings on either side of the street. After much debate, and despite lingering apprehension from some community members, the “skybridge” design was approved. Construction began in 1973 and was completed for a grand opening of the new library on August 8, 1975. Two years later the library acquired the name we know it by today after the reception of a gift by radiologist and UVA alumnus Dr. Claude Moore.

Over the last 40 years of the Health Sciences Library’s history, the library has experienced tremendous collection growth, embraced the advent of new technologies and digital resources, and completed a major renovation project from 1999-2000 to create a new journal room, computer lab, updated entry foyer and service desk, group study rooms, and expanded Historical Collections area. Just last year the Library opened a satellite unit, the Patient & Family Library, in the UVA Hospital’s main lobby. In 2016 the library continues its mission to support education, research, patient care, and community service at the UVA Health System, serving as a leader in the creation, organization, sharing, and preservation of biomedical knowledge. Help us celebrate this 40 year milestone at a celebration Friday, April 8, 2016, at 12:30 pm in the main lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

New E-Books

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WoundThe newly published books listed below have recently been added to the Library’s collection of electronic books. Click on any linked title to browse a table of contents or to read the full-text. A more comprehensive list of health sciences e-books available can be found on the Library’s E-Books page. Do you want to recommend the purchase of a book for the Library’s collection? You can submit your requests via our online Purchase Recommendation form.

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