New Ebook: Customer Service in Health Care

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

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2015 Journal Citation Reports (JCR) Now Available

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Thomson Reuters has released the 2015 Journal Citation Reports (JRC), which contains impact factors for 11,149 journals covering 237 disciplines.

Here is a look at the new JCR features:

  • Journal Impact Factor Percentile: Science Citation Index founder and father of bibliometrics, Dr. Eugene Garfield, worked with Alexander Pudovkin and a team of Thomson Reuters data scientists to develop this new metric. A normalized journal impact factor provides percentile value allowing for a proper and meaningful comparison of journals across different categories. 
  • Normalized EigenfactorTM: This improved calculation was developed by the Eigenfactor team at the University of Washington to offer greater clarity around the metric; for example, if a journal’s Normalized Eigenfactor is two, it is twice as influential as other journals within the area of study. 
  • Supporting detailed analysis of underlying journal level data: Users are now able to download cited and citing data tables into an Excel file for greater transparency into the relationship between journals and the outcome of scholarship. 
  • OA Filter: This new feature — modeled after the Web of Science — allows users to evaluate the performance of OA journals.

Please contact the Health Sciences Library at hslref@virginia.edu or 434-924-5444 for additional information or assistance.

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Gray’s Anatomy: Past and Present

Figure 159 - Muscles of the Left Hand. Gray, Henry, and H. V Carter. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. Philadelphia: Blanchard and Lea, 1859.

Figure 159 – Muscles of the Left Hand. Gray, Henry, and H. V Carter. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. Philadelphia: Blanchard and Lea, 1859.

Gray’s Anatomy has been considered to be a landmark of medical literature ever since Drs. Henry Gray and H.V. Carter published the first edition in 1858. Still going strong in 2008, Elsevier celebrated the 150th anniversary of the work by publishing a 40th edition in both print and electronic formats.  The publication of a 41st edition of Gray’s Anatomy is planned for later this year.

The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has over the years acquired many editions of Gray’s Anatomy. The oldest volume in our collection, published in 1859, is the first U.S. edition. Originally titled, Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical, the 1859 work is a near replica of the first British edition published a year earlier.

Gray and Carter’s book was an instant success in both Great Britain and the United States because it was accurate, clearly written, well organized, and relatively affordable. Despite the popularity of the original text and illustrations, each subsequent edition of Gray’s Anatomy incorporated new material to ensure that the book remained relevant. Over time, the revisions gradually transformed Gray and Carter’s book and, as a result, the most recent editions contain little of their original work.

To learn more about the origins of Gray’s Anatomy, check out Bill Hayes’s work, The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray’s Anatomy. Or, visit the Medical Center Hour channel at YouTube to view Dissecting Gray’s Anatomy, a lecture Hayes gave at the University of Virginia in 2014.

You can see for yourself how Gray’s Anatomy has changed since 1859 by viewing the print editions at the library and accessing the following electronic edition through your library account:

Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice, 40th edition

Gray’s Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice online

The Library also has several online anatomy study guides that are derived from the main publication:
Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy
Gray’s Anatomy for Students
Gray’s Basic Anatomy
Gray’s Clinical Neuroanatomy: The Anatomic Basis for Clinical Neuroscience
Gray’s Clinical Photographic Dissector of the Human Body

Historical data and photo provided by Dan Cavanaugh, Historical Collections Specialist.

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Lynda.com Online Training Videos Now Available

lynda_logo1k-d_72x72Lynda.com is now available for current UVa students, faculty, and staff.  This free access includes the entire library of over 3,500 video courses.  JavaScript, jQuery, Camtasia, Revit, iMovie, Photoshop, Sketchup, Unity, and “R” are just a few examples of the variety of tutorials  available.

Why you and your users might be interested?

– Employees now have 24/7 access to great training and can connect from computers, tablets, or mobile devices.

– Students have access as well — for courses/classes, work studies, internships, as well as personal development.

– Professors and instructors are able to incorporate this resource in courses, create custom playlists, and share links to specific lessons. 

– The searchable transcripts make it easy to find specific words or phrases within specific lessons.

How to Connect?

Link to Lynda for UVA

Need help?

If you have questions, please use Ask a Librarian for current and up to date information. 

http://www.library.virginia.edu/askalibrarian/

Post adapted from email message from Jama Coartney, Head of Digital Media Lab, UVA Libraries.

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New Information about Medieval Manuscript

A closeup view of one of the decorated initials depicted on a medieval manuscript at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

A decorated initial depicted on a medieval manuscript at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Earlier this year, staff members at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library discovered two manuscript leaves from a medieval European work hidden in our collections. At the time we did not know much about the manuscripts and we had many questions. Where were they produced? When were they made? What is written on them?

Eric Ramirez-Weaver, a faculty member of the University of Virginia and an expert in Medieval European art, recently analyzed the lost manuscripts and answered these questions for us. According to Ramirez-Weaver, the pages were written in a form of Gothic script known as rotunda, which flourished in Italy around 1400 CE. One page contains an excerpt from St. Augustine of Hippo’s sermon on Martha and Mary written in Latin. The other page contains a theological work, again in Latin, attributed to an author who has been historically misidentified as St. Jerome.

It appears that the manuscript leaves were likely folios from a form of medieval anthology known as a compilatio, that was usually produced to encourage discussion about scientific, moral and ethical issues. Around 1550, many Europeans considered these anthologies to be antiquated and often destroyed or recycled them.

The two manuscripts in our collection were recycled by an Italian bookbinder in the 16th century. The bookbinder removed the leaves from their original book and pasted them to paper boards in the binding of a new collection of works by the ancient Roman physician Galen of Pergamum. This kind of recycling was common in 16th century Europe because parchment, the material on which the manuscripts are written, provided excellent support in book bindings.

For almost 500 years the manuscripts remained hidden in the binding of the collected works of Galen, but by accident, are now available again for study at the Health Sciences Library.

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Featured E-book: Upside of Aging

The Upside of Aging: How Long Life Is Changing the World of Health, Work, Innovation, Policy and Purpose explores a titanic shift that will alter every aspect of human existence, from the jobs we hold to the products we buy to the medical care we receive - an aging revolution underway across America and the world.

The Upside of Aging: How Long Life Is Changing the World of Health, Work, Innovation, Policy and Purpose explores a titanic shift that will alter every aspect of human existence, from the jobs we hold to the products we buy to the medical care we receive – an aging revolution underway across America and the world.

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Records from the Great Plague of London

Post contributed by Emily Bowden, Historical Collections Assistant at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library

Two men dissecting a body with plague.

The title page of Thomson’s Loimotomia: or, the Pest Anatomized, 1666, showing Thomson and his assistant dissecting a plague victim. Image courtesy Wellcome Images.

 

In 1665 an unwelcome but not unfamiliar visitor stalked the streets of London, bringing with it widespread sickness, fear, and death. The Great Plague of London was the last major outbreak in a long string of bubonic plague epidemics to strike the city—last but certainly not least as in just one year it left a death toll of 70,000, nearly 15% of the population of London. The mortality rate peaked in September 1665 when over 7,000 died in one week.

While the city’s wealthy residents fled to the country, a physician named George Thomson stayed behind, unwilling to abandon his suffering patients. For centuries plague had been countered with a range of treatments, including bleeding, purging, herbal remedies, and fumigation, all without much effect. Quarantines were also imposed, but became impossible to enforce in 1665 as death tolls rose and the removal and burial of bodies took place continuously throughout the city. Thomson survived the plague, though not without a close brush with death. By his own account, he contracted the disease after conducting the dissection of a plague victim. When the usual remedies proved inadequate, Thomson turned to an unusual-sounding treatment (though at the time not uncommon): the “toad cure.” Placing a dried toad wrapped in linen on his stomach, Thomson observed the toad swell as it drew the “pestilential poison” out of his body, leaving him fully cured of the disease. This treatment is reminiscent of a similarly unlikely plague cure documented two decades earlier, which required an identical procedure, except with a puppy substituted for Thomson’s dried toad. Thomson recorded his efforts to understand and eliminate the plague in a work published in 1666 titled Loimotomia: or, the Pest Anatomized, a copy of which is held in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

In the 1578 "Plague Book", Queen Elizabeth's advisers discuss the importance of clean apparel in controlling the spread of the plague.

In the 1578 “Plague Book”, Queen Elizabeth’s advisers discuss the importance of clean apparel in controlling the spread of the plague.

Thomson’s 1666 book isn’t the only plague-related work in the library’s collection. You can also find an edict first issued in 1578 by Queen Elizabeth I and her Privy Council. The orders, which would still have been in effect during the Great Plague of 1665, record examples of plague treatments, as well as instructions for handling the dead bodies of plague victims, imposing quarantines, and (of great importance) collecting taxes from quarantined towns. In May of 1666, after the Great Plague of London had run its course, a new official plague edict was issued. The contents of our sixteenth century “Plague Book” have been fully digitized and are available through an online exhibit. Both the “Plague Book” and Thomson’s Loimotomia provide a fascinating glimpse of the terror disease commanded in past centuries, a fear that perhaps seems less distant after witnessing recent outbreaks of measles and Ebola in the world today.

 

Gilman, E.B. (2009). Plague writing in early modern England. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

The great plague of London, 1665. (2015). Contagion: Historical views of diseases and epidemics. Retrieved from: http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/contagion/plague.html

Sherwood, J. (2010, November 30). “Of puppies and toads: Marvelous cures for the plague.” Retrieved from: http://williameamon.com/?p=329

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Sign Up Now for Library Tips & Tricks Class

Does your job role include tracking down journal articles? Entering those citations into a manuscript and its bibliography? Requesting copies of articles or books? Ever been asked to find an impact factor, or an h-index?  Want to learn where the Library’s “how-to” documents are on our Website, so you can have help at your fingertips?

If so, this session is for you! Join us learn about useful library resources and services, and how you can maximize them to streamline your work.

Presented by Andrea Denton

HSL Carter Classroom

Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:00am to 10:00am

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Media Creation Software in the Library

Software Titles Level of Support Operating System Location
Adobe Photoshop Elements Mid-Level Mac Media Studio
Audacity Basic Mac Media Studio
Final Cut Express Basic Mac Media Studio
Fugu Full Mac Media Studio
GarageBand Full Mac Media Studio
iDVD Full Mac Media Studio
iMovie Full Mac Media Studio
iPhoto Full Mac Media Studio
iTunes Full Mac Media Studio
Office 2011 Mid-Level Mac Media Studio
QuickTime Full Mac Media Studio
Titanium Toast Full Mac Media Studio
VLC Media Player Full Mac Media Studio
Xilisoft Video Conversion Full Mac Media Studio
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