Featured E-book: Fostering Clinical Success

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Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), long esteemed for its rigorous science and technical excellence, takes time each day for something seemingly unscientific: telling stories. Why? Research has shown that in today’s high-tech, rapid-change environment, one of the simplest tools — storytelling — can significantly improve outcomes. MGH’s systematic use of clinical narratives has improved patient care and increased patient, family, and staff satisfaction while reducing costs. Used in conjunction with best-practice technical expertise, clinical narratives have become a key component of the hospital’s evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation. In Fostering Clinical Success, MGH nurse leaders share their model for creating, embedding, and fostering a narrative culture. Create a safer environment for your patients and improve the practice environment for your staff through storytelling and other evidence-based techniques presented by three nurse leaders at a premier U.S. hospital.

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Here’s Where Most of Our Old Print Journals Are Located

Ivy Stacks is a high-density shelving facility located on Ivy Road.  Several years ago, we made the decision to send most of our older print journals to Ivy Stacks in order to free up space for other purposes.  Here’s a short video of the facility produced by the University of Virginia Magazine.

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Introduction to the History of the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission

This post will be the first in an ongoing series that will tell the history of the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission and the historical context of its work. The posts are and will become pages of a revamped online exhibit about the Commission. Some of the posts will contain content that has been previously published by the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, while others will contain new content. 

Walter Reed sailing to Cuba, circa 1900. Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection 1806-1995, Box-folder 87:39, Historical Collections, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia.

Walter Reed sailing to Cuba, circa 1900. Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection 1806-1995, Box-folder 87:39, Historical Collections, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia.

Here I have been sitting reading that most wonderful book — La Roche on Yellow Fever — written in 1853. Forty-seven years later it has been permitted to me & my assistants to lift the impenetrable veil that has surrounded the causation of this most dreadful pest of humanity and to put it on a rational & scientific basis.” —Walter Reed in a letter he wrote to his wife at midnight, December 31, 1900 [1]

In Cuba, at the dawn of the twentieth century, the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission had demonstrated irrefutably that the mosquito was the vector of transmission for yellow fever. Cuban scientist Carlos J. Finlay had first proposed such a connection in 1881, but had not been able to prove his theory conclusively to the world scientific community.

The members of the Commission, Walter Reed, James Carroll, Aristides Agramonte, and particularly Johns Hopkins scientist Jessie Lazear, had sought Finlay’s assistance to clarify and ultimately test the mosquito theory. Indeed in the very early stages of the investigation, Lazear lost his life to a case of yellow fever, very likely experimental in origin.

Deeply dismayed at the loss of their friend and colleague, but intrigued by the very real possibility of a solution within reach, the Commission designed an experimental protocol which would withstand strict scientific scrutiny. They obtained permission from the military leadership to establish an experimental facility — which they named Camp Lazear — on the outskirts of Havana and implemented a bold study using human subjects. Despite the risk, the experiment required human subjects because yellow fever was not known to have an affect on any other species. In 1900, human experimentation was not a new idea, but unlike most other studies of that period, the subjects at Camp Lazear would be volunteers. They would have full knowledge of the experiment and its potential consequences.

As Walter Reed wrote to his wife, the experiments proved dramatically successful. Mosquito eradication programs were soon implemented throughout the Americas and yellow fever was largely conquered in the Western Hemisphere.

Sources:

[1] Letter from Walter Reed to Emilie Lawrence Reed,  December 31, 1900. Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection 1806-1995, Box-folder 22:62. Historical Collections, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, University of Virginia.

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Minor Changes to CMHSL Webpage

The following changes were made recently to the vertical orange ribbon on the CMHSL webpage.  If you have questions about the changes, please contact David Moody, IT Department Manager, at dam8u@virginia.edu.

1. The list title is now Top Resources rather than Databases.

2. A link to AccessMedicine has been added.

3. The link to Virgo has been moved up to the Top Resources section.

4. The header , Journals & Books, has replaced by dashes.

5. The link to ILLiad Interlibrary Loan has been removed from  A link to ILL is still available in the Library at a Glance box under Services.

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New Ebook: The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice

The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice provides highly accessible, concise coverage of all the essential basic science required by today’s ophthalmologists and optometrists in training. It is also essential reading for those embarking on a career in visual and ophthalmic science, as well as an invaluable, current refresher for the range of practitioners working in this area.

The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice provides coverage of all the essential basic science required by today’s ophthalmologists and optometrists in training. It is also essential reading for those embarking on a career in visual and ophthalmic science, as well as an invaluable, current refresher for the range of practitioners working in this area.

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The Body in Motion: Fralin Exhibition

The Body in Motion
April 17 – August 2, 2015

Curated by the U.Va. Museums Internship Class under the guidance of M. Jordan Love, Academic Curator, The Fralin Museum of Art

Interns: Christopher Askew, Melissa Brashear, Sydney Collins, Brenna Darrouch, Sean Kim, Riley McCall, Esra Park, Kathryn Scully, Madeline Smith, Holly Zajur

U.Va.’s Museums Internship Class has been given the unique opportunity to curate an exhibition. After searching the Museum’s permanent collection, the class was drawn toward photographs of the body in motion.

Using twentieth-century photography, the exhibition explores the various ways in which the body expresses itself. Photography was the first medium to accurately capture the body in an instant of movement. Some of these images incorporate purposeful and organized dance, while others are more instinctive. Our culture’s interest in the action shot, especially when it comes to dance and sports, reflects our amazement with the capability of the human body. This exhibition highlights the extent to which people push the boundaries of their bodies. It encourages the contemplation of the body’s motion through the medium of photography.

The Fralin Museum of Art’s programming is made possible by the generous support of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

The exhibition is also made possible by the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Art$, Suzanne Foley Endowment Funt, WTJU 91.1 FM, albemarleMagazine, and Ivy Publications LLC’s Charlottesville Welcome Book.

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CINAHL Full Text Now Available

CINAHL

CINAHL with Full Text provides full text for 550 nursing and allied health journals and covers a wide range of topics including nursing, biomedicine, health sciences librarianship, alternative/complementary medicine, consumer health and 17 allied health disciplines.

This full-text resource also includes the CINAHL index of over 3,000 nursing and allied health journals including publications from the National League for Nursing, and the American Nurses’ Association. In addition, this database provides access to health care books, nursing dissertations, selected conference proceedings, standards of practice, audiovisuals, book chapters and more.

CINAHL with Full Text replaces the standard CINAHL database, which provides full-text access to 70 journals.

Please contact Dan Wilson (danwilson@virginia.edu) with any questions.

 

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New Ebook: Customer Service in Health Care

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

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