Additional Booths Available in CMHSL Lobby

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We added more booths to the lobby, as this area has become a popular space for patrons to study and collaborate.  Two mobile whiteboards are also available.

Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses at UVA

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The UVA Professional Nursing Staff Organization (PNSO) supports and encourages evidence-based practice (EBP) to improve care and achieve excellent outcomes throughout the institution. Nurses are empowered to make a difference at UVA Health System by adopting an evidence-based approach to their practice. To help facilitate this process, the Health Sciences Library has developed an Evidence-Based Nursing Page: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/portal/sonursing/ebn.cfm

This resource contains information about searching our specialized EBP databases and resources. Nurses understand that the evolving information landscape requires them to develop information management skills in order to address the many questions that arise in their education, practice, and research, and the Library is instrumental in collecting resources to aid in this development.

The Evidence Based Nursing page also contains a link to the Evidence-Based Practice Toolkit: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/node/14254 , which describes the UVA Evidence-Based Practice Framework. This framework establishes a process for assessing and critiquing research, and incorporating and implementing validated research into nursing practice at UVA Health System. Any clinician may use the Evidence-Based Practice Template to submit a preliminary assessment of the evidence supporting a recommendation for practice change to the PNSO’s Research, Review, and Recommendation Committee (R3).

To facilitate collaborative use of the Template, the Library has developed an online Journal Club https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/journal-club-dashboard that follows the structure of the print resource but allows email discussion of the appraisal of individual journal articles.

In this technology-based health care world, nurses need skills and resources in order to find reliable information and the Health Sciences Library continues to be an integral partner in advancing nurses’ evidence-based practice at UVA.

Women’s History Month: Sara Ruth Dean

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On January 12, 1920, five months before the passage of the 19th amendment guaranteed U.S. women the right to vote, a meeting of the University of Virginia Board of Visitors included a revolutionary decision:

“RESOLVED by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, that beginning with the session opening in September 1920, mature and properly qualified women be admitted to the graduate and professional schools of the University…” [1]

At the following meeting on February 19, 1920, the Board of Visitors composed age and education requirements for women applicants. For prospective female medical students, these criteria included being no younger than twenty years old on the date of registration and possessing at least two years of prior college work. [2] When the fall term began later that year, two women had been admitted to join the medical student ranks: Sara Ruth Dean of Mississippi and Lila Morse Bonner of South Carolina. Having already completed two years of study in medicine at the University of Mississippi, Dean would graduate from UVA just two years later in 1922, earning the distinction of being the first woman to graduate from the School of Medicine. In 1924, Bonner would become the second to do so.

Members of the faculty with the School of Medicine class of 1922, featuring Sara Ruth Dean in the second row from the top. Prints21251, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Members of the faculty with the School of Medicine class of 1922, featuring Sara Ruth Dean in the second row from the top. Prints21251, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Historical records in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library contain little information about Sara Ruth Dean during her time at UVA. Her name appears on the 1920-1921 and 1921-1922 medical student registers, and she is included among the list of graduates who received their diplomas on June 13, 1922. After obtaining her medical degree, Dr. Dean worked at children’s hospitals in Boston and Denver before returning to her hometown of Greenwood, Mississippi, where she established a private pediatrics practice in 1928. [3] Five year later, Dean’s career as a child specialist suffered a serious setback when she found herself making headlines around the nation as the central figure in a murder trial.

In 1933, the sudden death of another Greenwood physician, Dr. John Preston Kennedy, led to charges that Dean had fatally poisoned Kennedy with a mercury-laced cocktail. The highly publicized Dean-Kennedy case hinged on a deathbed accusation made by Kennedy to his brothers, love letters between Kennedy and Dean, and testimonials from several respected physicians disputing the mercury-poisoning diagnosis. After a lengthy trial during which Dean staunchly maintained her innocence, the 35-year-old doctor was convicted of Kennedy’s murder and sentenced to life imprisonment. She lost the appeal but then in July of 1935 received a full pardon from Mississippi Governor Sennett Conner.

While her involvement in a murder trial may have garnered far more attention during her lifetime, Dr. Dean’s legacy as the first woman to graduate from the School of Medicine marks an important milestone in the history of women at UVA. Soon after the arrival of female graduate and professional students, women began to be accepted in other areas of academic life at the University. Dr. Thelma F. Brumfield (later Dunn), herself a 1926 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine, became the first woman faculty member of the School of Medicine when she was hired by the Department of Bacteriology and Pathology in 1927.

 

Thelma F. Brumfield Dunn, 1929. Prints21268, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Thelma F. Brumfield Dunn, 1929. Prints21268, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Despite the significance of these steps to open the doors of the School of Medicine to female students and faculty members, for many decades after 1920 women remained a very small minority at UVA and in the medical profession as well. Not until the mid-1970s would Title IX and shifting social perceptions spur a sharp rise in the number of women pursuing careers in medicine. Almost 100 years after the Board of Visitors first voted to admit female graduate students, and in honor of Women’s History Month, we remember some of the early figures who helped pave the way for women at the UVA School of Medicine.

1. Board of Visitors Minutes. (1920 January 12). University of Virginia.

2. Board of Visitors Minutes. (1920 February 19). University of Virginia.

3. Selected articles from The Greenwood Commonwealth. (1928-1934). University of Virginia School of Medicine Biographical Files, #MS-36, Box 2. Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Patient & Family Library Celebrates 1st Birthday

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Briar, the Faery Librarian, was the featured guest for the 1st birthday celebration of the Patient & Family Library (PFL).  Lydia Witman, PFL manager, was pleased with the response to Briar, saying, “I was pleasantly surprised by how much the adults loved Briar, too–parents, adult patients, and staff. In the hospital setting we need more moments of laughter and smiles.”

Briar is scheduled to visit the PFL on the second Thursday of every month at 2pm.  The PFL is open Monday through Friday, 10am to 4pm, and is located in the University Hospital Lobby behind the Information Desk.

Find out more about the Patient & Family Library by clicking on hsl.virginia.edu/pfl.

New Exhibit: The Anatomical Theatre

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The Anatomical Theatre from “View of the University, Charlottesville & Monticello, taken from Lewis Mountain” by E. Sachse & Co., published by C. Bohn, 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library.

The Anatomical Theatre from “View of the University, Charlottesville & Monticello, taken from Lewis Mountain” by E. Sachse & Co., published by C. Bohn, 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library.

The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library is hosting a new exhibit on an old building. What makes this building interesting? Well, for starters, it was designed by Thomas Jefferson. He didn’t include it in his original plans for the University of Virginia, but by the beginning of classes in 1825, Jefferson and the Board of Visitors were discussing the need for this additional structure. In the early days of the University, professors lived and taught in their pavilions on the Lawn, but it was clear that teaching anatomy in the same building where a professor and his family lived was not a good arrangement. So Jefferson designed a 44-foot square, multi-story, brick building containing an amphitheater for teaching, a museum to display skeletons and wax medical models, and a charnel for body parts and cadavers. This design formed the basis for what would become the Anatomical Theatre.

The exhibit looks at the early days of medical education at the University with a particular focus on the teaching of anatomy, and it explains how bodies were obtained, often by “resurrectionists” or grave robbers, for students to dissect. It explores various architectural changes made to the Anatomical Theatre over the years, as well as the different purposes the building served after first opening for classes in the spring of 1828.

 

The Anatomical Theatre circa 1920s-1930s. MSS 15048, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library.

The Anatomical Theatre circa 1920s-1930s. MSS 15048, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library.

Interested in visiting this Jeffersonian building? Sadly, the structure no longer exists. Perched on the side of a ravine that was filled in during the construction of Alderman Library, the Anatomical Theatre’s location became problematic, and it was demolished in 1939. Though the Theatre’s bricks were scattered across the University to repair other buildings and the serpentine walls, its story is told in words, pictures, and four salvaged bricks in the CMHSL lobby. The exhibit was designed by Janet Pearson of Historical Collections & Services, and will be on display from March 7 until July 22, 2016.

 

Convenient Access to Core Medical Journals

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Click on the image above to see current issues of core medical journals.  For additional journals, navigate through the subjects listed in the left column or search by title.

Workshop for Increasing Openness and Reproducibility in Quantitative Research

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  COS workshop

 

There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work. The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

Topics will include:

  • Project documentation
  • Version control
  • Pre-Analysis plans
  • Open source tools like the Center for Open Science’s Open Science Framework to easily implement these concepts in a scientific workflow.

This workshop is aimed at graduate students and post docs, across disciplines, who are engaged in quantitative research. The workshop does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows.

Speaker: Courtney Soderberg Courtney is the Statistical and Methodological Consultant at the Center for Open Science and heads up its training programs for reproducible research methods. She has a Ph.D. in Experimental Social Psychology with a minor in Quantitative Psychology from UC Davis.

Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

Date: Monday, April 4, 2016

Time: 9:00am-12:00am

Location:  Brown Science and Engineering Library Electronic Classroom (Room 133)

Space is limited; click here to register.

Co-hosted by:

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Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy

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AclandThe University of Virginia now has extended trial access to Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy. The Video Atlas was developed for use by medical and dental students. Because of its realism, simple language, and three-dimensional quality, the Video Atlas has become popular with students and teachers in many other fields.  For medical students, the Video Atlas is productive and time efficient as a preview, as an adjunct to dissection, and as a review tool. It is also helpful for students who need to re-learn clinically relevant anatomy for their surgical rotations. Since surgeons in training must re-learn anatomy at many stages in their careers the Video Atlas is popular with interns and residents in surgical specialties. Practicing surgeons and physicians value the Video Atlas as a quick way to renew their anatomical knowledge, and also as a way to help their patients understand an ailment, injury, or procedure. The Video Atlas is widely used by students and teachers in nursing, physical and occupational therapy, kinesiology, and massage therapy. For students who don’t have access to dissection facilities, the Video Atlas provides an appreciation of the real human body and a direct understanding of the mechanics of body movement.

Trial access to Acland’s Video Atlas will run through the end of June 2016.  Atlas users are encouraged to send any comments to Jonathan Lord at jonlord@virginia.edu.

New E-Books

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The book titles listed below have recently been added to the Library’s growing collection of electronic books. Click on a linked book title below to browse a table of contents or to read the full-text. A more comprehensive list of e-books available can be found on the Library’s E-Books page. Do you want to recommend the purchase of a book for the Library’s collection? You can submit your requests by using our online Purchase Recommendation form.

Andreoli and Carpenter’s Cecil Essentials of Medicine
Braddom’s Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Campbell’s Core Orthopaedic Procedures
Cardiovascular Intervention: A Companion to Braunwald’s Heart Disease
Clinical Dermatology
Clinical Radiation Oncology
Current Therapy of Trauma and Surgical Critical Care
Dorland’s Dictionary of Medical Acronyms and Abbreviations
Evaluation of Health Care Quality in Advanced Practice Nursing
Evidence-Based Practice of Critical Care, 2nd Edition
Kanski’s Clinical Ophthalmology:A Systematic Approach, 8th edition
McDonald and Avery’s Dentistry for the Child and Adolescent
Medical Terminology Systems: A Body Systems Approach
Memory Loss, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Dementia: A Practical Guide for Clinicians
Murray & Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine
Netter’s Atlas of Neuroscience, 3rd edition
Netter’s Orthopaedic Clinical Examination, 3rd edition
Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
Otologic Surgery
Principles and Practice of Laser Dentistry
Principles and Practice of Lymphedema Surgery
Scholarly Inquiry and the DNP Capstone
The Doctor Of Nursing Practice
Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, 13th edition

From the Library Director: Looking Forward

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_DSC7569-01-3Best wishes to everyone for 2016!  I like to say (frequently) that this Library is a “forward looking” library.  That is not to say that what we have done in the past or what we are currently doing is wrong or poorly done.  Quite the contrary.  However, as all of us know, we live in a time of tremendous change and libraries are not immune.

I recently viewed this video about IBM Watson (see below).  One of the functions of IBM Watson is to ingest the scholarly medical literature on a particular subject, for example oncology, and be able to synthesize this knowledge and make recommendations for clinical care.  The creators of IBM Watson are quick to point out that human judgement is still essential especially in the final decision making but the laborious literature searching and analysis can be done through machine learning.

Medical libraries have traditionally served in the role of hosting or housing the medical literature and in many cases assisting with searching and finding information.  What if IBM Watson (or something like that) provides this service?  I say that is a good thing, as it would be applying efficiencies and quality measures where they can do the most good.

There are many opportunities for libraries to contribute both upstream and downstream in the research process.  With knowledge being born and essentially living digital, with no print format in some cases, there are many challenges to be solved.  How does one transform collected data into a format that can be used?  How can it be stored and made available for reproducibility or reuse?

Similarly, how is data stored for perpetuity?  How can data be visualized, shared or combined with additional data so that it can be meaningful and lead to innovative discoveries and conclusions?  What are the best practices and how do people learn about them?  These are all traditional library functions now applied to the digital world where knowledge exist in formats beyond books and journals, even electronic books and journals.

Admittedly, this is not a transition for the faint hearted.  It requires constant reminders that libraries are in the knowledge industry and not just the book and journal business.  It requires the recognition that new skill sets are needed.  It requires a tolerance for the unknown and a willingness to take risks and learn from them.  It means that we look for partners and collaborators whose expertise and goals are complementary.  It means that instead of saying “no we don’t do that” we say “well let’s talk some more because maybe we can help.”  It means having the confidence that we can bring value to our organizations in their efforts to achieve their mission.  It is great time to be a librarian!