New Ebook: The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice

The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice provides highly accessible, concise coverage of all the essential basic science required by today’s ophthalmologists and optometrists in training. It is also essential reading for those embarking on a career in visual and ophthalmic science, as well as an invaluable, current refresher for the range of practitioners working in this area.

The Eye: Basic Sciences in Practice provides coverage of all the essential basic science required by today’s ophthalmologists and optometrists in training. It is also essential reading for those embarking on a career in visual and ophthalmic science, as well as an invaluable, current refresher for the range of practitioners working in this area.

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The Body in Motion: Fralin Exhibition

The Body in Motion
April 17 – August 2, 2015

Curated by the U.Va. Museums Internship Class under the guidance of M. Jordan Love, Academic Curator, The Fralin Museum of Art

Interns: Christopher Askew, Melissa Brashear, Sydney Collins, Brenna Darrouch, Sean Kim, Riley McCall, Esra Park, Kathryn Scully, Madeline Smith, Holly Zajur

U.Va.’s Museums Internship Class has been given the unique opportunity to curate an exhibition. After searching the Museum’s permanent collection, the class was drawn toward photographs of the body in motion.

Using twentieth-century photography, the exhibition explores the various ways in which the body expresses itself. Photography was the first medium to accurately capture the body in an instant of movement. Some of these images incorporate purposeful and organized dance, while others are more instinctive. Our culture’s interest in the action shot, especially when it comes to dance and sports, reflects our amazement with the capability of the human body. This exhibition highlights the extent to which people push the boundaries of their bodies. It encourages the contemplation of the body’s motion through the medium of photography.

The Fralin Museum of Art’s programming is made possible by the generous support of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation.

The exhibition is also made possible by the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Art$, Suzanne Foley Endowment Funt, WTJU 91.1 FM, albemarleMagazine, and Ivy Publications LLC’s Charlottesville Welcome Book.

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CINAHL Full Text Now Available

CINAHL

CINAHL with Full Text provides full text for 550 nursing and allied health journals and covers a wide range of topics including nursing, biomedicine, health sciences librarianship, alternative/complementary medicine, consumer health and 17 allied health disciplines.

This full-text resource also includes the CINAHL index of over 3,000 nursing and allied health journals including publications from the National League for Nursing, and the American Nurses’ Association. In addition, this database provides access to health care books, nursing dissertations, selected conference proceedings, standards of practice, audiovisuals, book chapters and more.

CINAHL with Full Text replaces the standard CINAHL database, which provides full-text access to 70 journals.

Please contact Dan Wilson (danwilson@virginia.edu) with any questions.

 

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New Ebook: Customer Service in Health Care

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

Research confirms that it is six times more costly to attract a new customer than it is to retain an existing one. Creating a culture of service excellence requires planning, preparation, and persistence. Customer Service in Health Care is designed to provide readers with the fundamental information and skills to start or strengthen a customer service initiative within a health care organization.

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Gray’s Anatomy: Past and Present

Figure 159 - Muscles of the Left Hand. Gray, Henry, and H. V Carter. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. Philadelphia: Blanchard and Lea, 1859.

Figure 159 – Muscles of the Left Hand. Gray, Henry, and H. V Carter. Anatomy, Descriptive and Surgical. Philadelphia: Blanchard and Lea, 1859.

Gray’s Anatomy has been considered to be a landmark of medical literature ever since Drs. Henry Gray and H.V. Carter published the first edition in 1858. Still going strong in 2008, Elsevier celebrated the 150th anniversary of the work by publishing a 40th edition in both print and electronic formats.  The publication of a 41st edition of Gray’s Anatomy is planned for later this year.

The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has over the years acquired many editions of Gray’s Anatomy. The oldest volume in our collection, published in 1859, is the first U.S. edition. Originally titled, Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical, the 1859 work is a near replica of the first British edition published a year earlier.

Gray and Carter’s book was an instant success in both Great Britain and the United States because it was accurate, clearly written, well organized, and relatively affordable. Despite the popularity of the original text and illustrations, each subsequent edition of Gray’s Anatomy incorporated new material to ensure that the book remained relevant. Over time, the revisions gradually transformed Gray and Carter’s book and, as a result, the most recent editions contain little of their original work.

To learn more about the origins of Gray’s Anatomy, check out Bill Hayes’s work, The Anatomist: A True Story of Gray’s Anatomy. Or, visit the Medical Center Hour channel at YouTube to view Dissecting Gray’s Anatomy, a lecture Hayes gave at the University of Virginia in 2014.

You can see for yourself how Gray’s Anatomy has changed since 1859 by viewing the print editions at the library and accessing the following electronic edition through your library account:

Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice, 40th edition

Gray’s Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis of Clinical Practice online

The Library also has several online anatomy study guides that are derived from the main publication:
Gray’s Atlas of Anatomy
Gray’s Anatomy for Students
Gray’s Basic Anatomy
Gray’s Clinical Neuroanatomy: The Anatomic Basis for Clinical Neuroscience
Gray’s Clinical Photographic Dissector of the Human Body

Historical data and photo provided by Dan Cavanaugh, Historical Collections Specialist.

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Lynda.com Online Training Videos Now Available

lynda_logo1k-d_72x72Lynda.com is now available for current UVa students, faculty, and staff.  This free access includes the entire library of over 3,500 video courses.  JavaScript, jQuery, Camtasia, Revit, iMovie, Photoshop, Sketchup, Unity, and “R” are just a few examples of the variety of tutorials  available.

Why you and your users might be interested?

– Employees now have 24/7 access to great training and can connect from computers, tablets, or mobile devices.

– Students have access as well — for courses/classes, work studies, internships, as well as personal development.

– Professors and instructors are able to incorporate this resource in courses, create custom playlists, and share links to specific lessons. 

– The searchable transcripts make it easy to find specific words or phrases within specific lessons.

How to Connect?

Link to Lynda for UVA

Need help?

If you have questions, please use Ask a Librarian for current and up to date information. 

http://www.library.virginia.edu/askalibrarian/

Post adapted from email message from Jama Coartney, Head of Digital Media Lab, UVA Libraries.

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New Information about Medieval Manuscript

A closeup view of one of the decorated initials depicted on a medieval manuscript at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

A decorated initial depicted on a medieval manuscript at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Earlier this year, staff members at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library discovered two manuscript leaves from a medieval European work hidden in our collections. At the time we did not know much about the manuscripts and we had many questions. Where were they produced? When were they made? What is written on them?

Eric Ramirez-Weaver, a faculty member of the University of Virginia and an expert in Medieval European art, recently analyzed the lost manuscripts and answered these questions for us. According to Ramirez-Weaver, the pages were written in a form of Gothic script known as rotunda, which flourished in Italy around 1400 CE. One page contains an excerpt from St. Augustine of Hippo’s sermon on Martha and Mary written in Latin. The other page contains a theological work, again in Latin, attributed to an author who has been historically misidentified as St. Jerome.

It appears that the manuscript leaves were likely folios from a form of medieval anthology known as a compilatio, that was usually produced to encourage discussion about scientific, moral and ethical issues. Around 1550, many Europeans considered these anthologies to be antiquated and often destroyed or recycled them.

The two manuscripts in our collection were recycled by an Italian bookbinder in the 16th century. The bookbinder removed the leaves from their original book and pasted them to paper boards in the binding of a new collection of works by the ancient Roman physician Galen of Pergamum. This kind of recycling was common in 16th century Europe because parchment, the material on which the manuscripts are written, provided excellent support in book bindings.

For almost 500 years the manuscripts remained hidden in the binding of the collected works of Galen, but by accident, are now available again for study at the Health Sciences Library.

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Featured E-book: Upside of Aging

The Upside of Aging: How Long Life Is Changing the World of Health, Work, Innovation, Policy and Purpose explores a titanic shift that will alter every aspect of human existence, from the jobs we hold to the products we buy to the medical care we receive - an aging revolution underway across America and the world.

The Upside of Aging: How Long Life Is Changing the World of Health, Work, Innovation, Policy and Purpose explores a titanic shift that will alter every aspect of human existence, from the jobs we hold to the products we buy to the medical care we receive – an aging revolution underway across America and the world.

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