Neilsen Consumer Marketing Data now Available

Performing research on the products we buy and how they relate to health and behavior is now easier thanks to subscription access to two consumer marketing datasets.

The U.Va. Library has recently subscribed to Neilsen Marketing Data from Marketing Data Center at Chicago Booth. The James M. Kilts Center for Marketing at Chicago Booth and the Neilsen Company have partnered to make the following datasets available to U.S.-based academic researchers:

Consumer Panel Data: include longitudinal data beginning in 2004 with annual updates. These data track a panel of 40,000 – 60,000 U.S. household and their purchases of fast-moving consumer goods from a wide range of retail outlets across all U.S. Markets.

Retail Scanner Data: consist of weekly pricing, volume, and store environment information generated by point-of-sale systems for more than 90 participating retail chains across all U.S. Markets. Data begin in 2006 and include annual updates.

A registration code is required to access the data online.  To receive the code and instructions on how to access the datasets, contact Summer Durrant (durrant@virginia.edu), Data Librarian, University of Virginia Library.

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Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination

BatesNow through the end of June, Health System faculty and students will have online access to the Bates Visual Guide to Physical Examination.  Based on the textbook of the same name, this site provides online access to a range of physical assessment videos.  Now in its Fifth Edition and featuring completely reshot content and new clinical skills videos, Bates’ Visual Guide delivers head-to-toe and systems-based physical examination techniques for basic and advanced  patient assessment. The site features more than 8 hours of video content:

Bates Visual Guide Trial Access 

Students and faculty in medical, nursing, and related programs will appreciate the careful attention to clinical accuracy, as well as the range of patient types profiled in the series. With the online delivery of content, users can now view the videos from any web-based location or device.

Lynn Bickley, MD, author of Bates’ Guide to Physical Examination and History Taking, serves as advisor to the project, ensuring the clinical content and its evidence-based origins are maintained. Dr. Bickley also worked with the professionals and actors herein to present a “patient-first” approach to the physical exam.

The Library welcomes your comments on the usefulness of the online Bates videos.  You can send your feedback to Jonathan Lord at jml4s@virginia.edu.

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Try DynaMed in June

dynamed  DynaMed  is a clinical reference tool created by physicians for physicians and other health care professionals for use at the point-of-care. With clinically-organized summaries for more than 3,200 topics, DynaMed provides the latest content and resources with validity, relevance and convenience, making DynaMed a valuable for answering most clinical questions.

DynaMed Features Include:

  • Updated daily to find the best available evidence at the Point of Care.
  • Monitors over 500 medical journals daily using a systematic surveillance process involving a 7 step methodology.  http://dynamed.ebscohost.com/content/7-step-process
  • Earn CME credit for DynaMed searches.
  • Web Access includes unlimited use, on-site, remote and mobile access.
  • Mobile access for cell phones including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, PDA, iPad. http://dynamed.ebscohost.com/access/mobile
  • Set personal alerts for notification when evidence on a topic is updated.
  • DynaMed and McMaster University Partnership creates a system to identify practice-changing DynaMed updates.
  • Medical calculators for medical equations, clinical criteria, decision trees, statistics & math calculators, units & doses & by specialty.
  • A Community of DynaMed Reviewers comprised of clinicians from 79 countries, representing 60 adult and pediatric specialties committed to improving health care and health care education through evidence-based medicine http://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/dynamed-reviewers
  • DynaMed Basic Search Tutorial:  http://support.ebsco.com/training/flash_videos/dynamed/dynamed.html

The Health Sciences Library has arranged for trial access now through the end of June, so give it a try and let Library staff know what you think of it.  Please direct your comments about DynaMed to Jonathan Lord at  jml4s@virginia.edu.

 

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Please Let CMHSL Know What You Think About Scopus

Scopus

The Scopus trial is now over.  Please send your feedback to Jonathan Lord, Collection Development Manager, at jml4s@virginia.edu.

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Try Out the New CMHSL Mondopad

IMG_2780An InFocus 55″ Mondopad is now available in the CMHSL BioConnector.  Features of the Mondopad include the following:

  • Multi-touch high definition 55-inch display
  • Built-in Windows PC with full version of Microsoft Office
  • Digital interactive whiteboard and document annotation
  • Video conferencing
  • Share, view and control from your notebook, tablet or smartphone

Anyone affiliated with the Health System can reserve the BioConnector by calling 434-924-5444.

 

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Get Away to CMHSL to Study, Work, Relax, and Collaborate

IMG_1109

Back in the years just before and after the turn of the twenty-first century, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library (CMHSL) was filled with stacks of journals and books.  The photocopy room was busy with patrons photocopying articles from journals, and library staff were continually reshelving journals.  In any given year, over 300,000 patrons would be counted going through library exit gates.

Now, 14 years into the 21st century, over 300,000 patrons still come through the library gates each year.  However, only a small percentage of them touch a print book or journal, as most of our content is available online.  CMHSL is still a place to study, but it’s also a place to relax, reflect, and collaborate.  In addition, it’s is a great place to get away from your busy workplaces to do research or catch up on work.

Here are some of the features of the new CMHSL:

  • A place to borrow equipment (laptops, tablets, projectors, Apple TV, video cameras, etc.).  Self-service equipment reservation system.
  • A place to reserve a study room for small meetings or for a secluded place to work.  Call 434-924-5444 to reserve a room.
  • A place for computers.  And if you bring a laptop, we have monitors that you can connect your laptop to throughout our study areas.
  • Home of the BioConnector, a room outfitted with advanced technology to promote  collaboration with colleagues and fellow students.  Call 434-924-5444 to reserve the BioConnector.
  • Home of the Tolleson Media Studio for audio and video production.  Call 434-924-5444 to reserve the Tolleson Media Studio.
  • Librarians available for one-on-one learning about library databases, RefWorks, reputation management, PowerPoint, PhotoShop, data management, research skills, emerging technologies, and audio/video production. Consultation Request Form.
  • A large after-hours space with tables, carrels, study rooms, comfortable chairs, printer/copier, and a coffee brewer that is open 24/7 365 days per year.
  • A place to experience medical history.  Call Historical Collections & Services at 434-982-0576 to make an appointment.

CMHSL is the hub of the Health System.  Through the library flows a myriad of online health care resources, and within its walls are expert staff and a space that is constantly evolving to meet the needs of the Health System.

 

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New Carpet in the Cabell Room

IMG_2762The Cabell Room is open again after being closed for a couple of days while new carpeting was installed.  Check it out!  This new carpet will soon be installed in all areas of the library.

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New Computers and More Monitors

IMG_2760

New Dells in the Carter Classroom.

15 new Dell OptiPlex 9010 computers have been added to the Carter Classroom (first floor of the library), and are available to anyone affiliated with UVA whenever a class is not in session.  And, in response to a request from a medical student, several monitors that the Dells replaced have been moved to the after-hours area for use with laptops.

Monitors in the after-hours area.

Monitors in the after-hours area.

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A Brief History of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library

The UVA Medical Library in the Mid 1950s

The UVA Medical Library in the Mid 1950s

The history of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library is directly linked to Thomas Jefferson, founder of the University in 1819. Mr. Jefferson personally selected the books for the University’s Library. He commissioned a Boston bookseller in 1825 to purchase $15,000 worth of books from Europe, numbering about 8,000 volumes, housed in the Rotunda. His collection choices included 710 volumes in the medical sciences to support the Department of Anatomy and Medicine under Dr. Robley Dunglison.

The Library struggled through its early years, with meager funding. The time of the Civil War was particularly difficult. Funds finally became available in 1880 to acquire a subscription to Index Medicus, which had just been published by the precursor to the National Library of Medicine. In the 1890s, the first card catalog was completed. The medical faculty made an attempt to separate the Medical Collection from the General Library Collection and place it in the Anatomical Theatre. Had they been successful, the medical books would have been spared the terrible tragedy of the burning of the Rotunda in 1895. As it was, the entire Medical Collection, and most of the General Collection was lost. The Library had to be totally rebuilt, mostly from generous gifts from alumni and other concerned individuals.

The beginning of the twentieth century saw professors at the University resorting to their own personal funds in order to provide materials for teaching. The hardship was most severe in the Medical Department due to the unusually large number of journals in the medical sciences and their high cost. In a step toward independence, a separate card catalog was created for the Medical Collection. In 1929, a new Medical School Building opened. This unified all the medical departments, which had been scattered throughout the Grounds. The Medical Collection became the Medical Library, and moved into new quarters in the Medical School Building. Despite its physical separation, however, the Medical Library was still a part of the University Library. In the 1940s and 1950s, funds for books and journals were scarce, although control of the Medical Book Fund was finally transferred from the University Library to the Medical School Dean.

In September 1962, Dr. Wilhelm Moll arrived and assumed his duties as Director of the Medical Library. Most significantly, his position now reported directly to the Medical School Dean. (Today, the Library Director reports to the Executive Vice President for the Health System.) Dr. Moll began planning for a new building which would house not only the scattered medical collections, but would incorporate the separate Nursing Library as well. The $2.3 million project was funded with a $1.5 million grant from the federal government, more than $500,000 raised by University alumni, friends, foundations, and some State appropriations. In April 1976, the new library building was dedicated and named the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library for Dr. Moore’s generous donation.

Following Dr. Moll’s death in 1979, Terry Thorkildson was Library Director until 1990. A key accomplishment during this time was the automation of the Library’s card catalog.

Linda Watson, the Director from 1990-2005, transformed the Library into a modern research library. She oversaw a major expansion and renovation project and lead the library through the early years of the Internet. In 2005, Watson left UVA to assume the position of the Director of the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Library.

In August 2005, Gretchen Arnold was appointed Interim Director and then Director in 2007. She oversaw a renovation project that increased the amount of study space and the size of the After-Hours room. Her tenure has focused on forging and developing strong collaborations within the Health System and across Grounds.

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Can This Information Be Trusted?

Medical students spend years mastering a well-developed curriculum of medical facts, the physical exam, and clinical skills.  And, since medicine is characterized by rapid turnover of critical information, it is essential that they learn the skills for identifying trusted information.

infomast

Karen Knight and Peter Ham

At the UVa School of Medicine, these skills are taught through the “Information Mastery/Information Sciences” thread that runs throughout the curriculum.  By linking their developing clinical knowledge with critical thinking skills, students are presented with a strategy for checking their information sources, prioritizing their reading, and talking with patients.

Students who develop Information Mastery skills can quickly locate valid and relevant answers to clinical questions from a broad range of ever-changing sources.    The skills will benefit them throughout their careers in patient care, management of healthcare resources, and contributions to the practice of medicine.

For more information, please contact the co-thread leaders:

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