New Exhibit: Surviving and Thriving

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A new traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine is on display in the main lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. Surviving and Thriving: AIDS, Politics, and Culture documents the history of AIDS and the experiences of people living with AIDS during the early years of the epidemic. Far more than just “AIDS patients,” these individuals were critical in the political and medical fight against HIV and AIDS.

First identified in 1981, AIDS quickly developed into a devastating epidemic in the United States. While physicians struggled to provide patient care and pursue research into HIV and AIDS, the U.S. government issued little response to the crisis for nearly half a decade. To counter this inaction on the part of the federal government, many people living with AIDS stepped into roles of activists and educators. These individuals promoted AIDS prevention methods, fought homophobia, and advocated for research funding and public health initiatives focused on addressing the epidemic.

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Brochures promoting AIDS education. Image from the National Library of Medicine.

The Surviving and Thriving exhibition was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. Visit the exhibition website for additional content and a digital gallery of posters and ephemera related to AIDS from the collections of the National Library of Medicine. Also on display in the Library lobby are research and educational publications on AIDS from the 1980s and 1990s, as well as documents related to the history of AIDS in Virginia and at UVA. The exhibit will be on display until August 11, 2017. For questions or comments about the exhibit, contact Historical Collections & Services.

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F1000 Workspace: A New Way Manage Literature References

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f1000Workspace_01-300x188What Is F1000Workspace? F1000Workspace is a platform to help biology and medical researchers discover and collect literature, manage references and prepare manuscripts, grant  applications, posters, talks, etc. for submission. It consists of a web-based application, a browser extension, and a powerful plugin for Microsoft Word plus a lightweight desktop app for importing PDFs. The browser extension adds a special button to your browser you can use to save and annotate articles as you browse. The Microsoft Word plugin allows you to easily insert citations, search for new references and even get smart citation recommendations. F1000Workspace is freely available to all UVa employees.

Using F1000Workspace

F1000Workspace has the following key functions:

  • Manage references – easily import your existing references and collect new ones using the F1000 browser button. You can import references from all popular reference management tools (EndNote, RefWorks, Mendeley, Zotero, Papers, etc.) as well as directly from PDFs on your computer.
  • Save and annotate – The F1000 browser extension allows you to easily save references as you browse to the webpage of a relevant article. You can save multiple references (for example from a PubMed search results page) and even save the citations of an article you are interested in. In addition you can highlight and annotate relevant text and share this with members of a shared project.
  • Share references – F1000Workspace allows you to set up shared projects where you and invited colleagues can create a shared reference list, share comments and annotations and easily edit each other’s references when in Word (you must have the F1000 Word plugin installed).
  • Reference discovery – At the core of F1000Workspace is an intelligent algorithm that suggests relevant references you may not have already discovered. This includes references recommended by the F1000 Faculty, a body of over 10,000 biomedical experts and other references from PubMed.

Getting started with F1000Workspace

Start by going to http://f1000.com/work and setting up an account. If you have an existing F1000Prime username and password, you can login with your existing credentials. F1000Workspace is primarily a web-based application, but it works best if you download the browser extension, Microsoft Word plugin and desktop shortcut. After registering for your F1000Workspace account, you can access various user guides in the following locations. These take you step-by step through the installation process:

If you have any questions about F1000 Workspace or any other literature reference management issues, you may contact one of our reference librarians at hslref@virginia.edu

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The Summer of Classes & Ice Cream

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Hot topics & cool ice cream: definitely a winning combination!

Hot topics & cool ice cream: definitely a winning combination!

If you’re searching for ways to stay cool this summer, then look no further than the Health Sciences Library! Our Summer Class Series offers hot topics and cold ice cream so that you can keep learning and enjoy delicious treats at the same time. Further, we’ve heard your requests for later class times, and we have listened! See the schedule below and, if you have questions, email Kimberley@virginia.edu.

*All classes in the Summer Series will take place in July, in the Health Sciences Library*

6th- “Beyond Bullets: Creating Better Presentations”
5:00 PM- 6:00 PM; Carter Classroom

10th- “Cool It Down with Teach-back when Low Health Literacy Turns Up The Heat”
4:30 PM- 5:30 PM; The MILL

11th- “Digital Privacy: Why you should care, and how to protect it”
5:00 PM- 6:00 PM; Carter Classroom

12th- “Introduction to Virtual Reality”
5:00 PM- 6:00 PM; The MILL

13th- “Altmetrics: New Measures for New Scholarly Products”
5:00 PM- 6:00 PM; Carter Classroom

17th- “Cool It Down with Teach-back when Low Health Literacy Turns Up The Heat”
4:30 PM- 5:30 PM; The MILL

19th- “Introduction to Digital Life”
5:00 PM – 6:00 PM; Carter Classroom

24th- “Cool It Down with Teach-back when Low Health Literacy Turns Up The Heat”
4:30 PM- 5:30 PM; The MILL

31st- “Cool It Down with Teach-back when Low Health Literacy Turns Up The Heat”
4:30 PM- 5:30 PM; The MILL

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AccessSurgery Not Being Renewed

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accesssurgery

After consultation with the Department of Surgery, the Library has decided to not renew the license for AccessSurgery online textbooks when the current agreement expires on June 30, 2017.  Decreased usage and rising costs were the basis for this decision.  However, some of the AccessSurgery textbooks will continue to be available through AccessMedicine:

Case Files: Surgery 
Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Orthopedics
Current Diagnosis & Treatment in Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
Current Diagnosis & Treatment: Surgery
Principles of Critical Care
Schwartz’s Principles of Surgery

Print copies of  a select number of other AccessSurgery textbooks are available in the Library’s Reserves collection.

 

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CMHSL: A New Live Performance Venue

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Beginning this fall, the Health Sciences Library will add live performance venue to its list of services and resources.  Scheduled throughout the year will be lunchtime performances provided by your fellow UVA students, staff, and faculty.  It’s all in the name of fun and the only payment is a little exposure and the satisfaction of providing a welcomed lunchtime respite to the Health System.

The kickoff event is Claudestock, which will take place on Tuesday, September 5th, from noon until 1pm.  During Claudestock, performers will be stationed at various non quiet study locations in and around the library.  Don’t miss out on this opportunity to perform at this inaugural event.  Remember how much Joni Mitchell regretted not performing at Woodstock.

Please contact Dan Wilson (danwilson@virginia.edu) or Kimberley Barker (krb3k@virginia.edu) for further information or to sign up.


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New Browser Extension to Access Free Articles

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Unpaywall is a browser extension to legally access free articles.  Available for Chrome and Firefox, Unpaywall searches thousands of open-access repositories worldwide, including PubMed Central, the DOAJ, Crossref, DataCite, Google Scholar, and BASE.

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Transplant Interest Group, others, to sponsor organ donation events

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A week-long series of events are planned for April 21-27.

A week-long series of events are planned for April 21-27.

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The Four Colleges of the UVA School of Medicine

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Today each medical student at UVA is assigned to one of four colleges within the School of Medicine: Dunglison College, Hunter College, Pinn College, and Reed College, but this system is a relatively new practice at UVA. Of the 123 students who attended the first session of the University of Virginia in 1825, 26 registered for courses in medicine and anatomy. Over the last nearly 200 years, medical education at UVA has steadily expanded, and, in 2016, there were 621 medical students enrolled in the UVA School of Medicine. In addition to increased class size, other 21st century changes to the medical school have included the opening of the new Claude Moore Medical Education Building and the debut of a revised medical curriculum. In response to these expansions, and in order to preserve close student-faculty relationships, four colleges were created within the UVA School of Medicine. The four college system was launched in 2010, each college with its own Dean for Student Affairs responsible for providing support and mentorship to his or her college’s students.

Robley Dunglison, 1865, F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia, PA, Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine; Thomas Harrison Hunter, circa 1953, Prints20709, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA; Walter Reed, 1901, Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection, MS-1, 087/38, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA; Vivian W. Pinn, 2007, Prints22019, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA.

Clockwise from top left: Robley Dunglison, 1865, Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine; Thomas Harrison Hunter, circa 1953, Prints20709, Historical Collections & Services; Walter Reed, 1901, Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection, MS-1, 087/38, Historical Collections & Services; Vivian W. Pinn, 2007, Prints22019, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA.

Four distinguished physicians associated with the history of the School of Medicine were selected to represent the four colleges, each serving as that college’s namesake. These namesakes consist of two UVA faculty members and two School of Medicine alumni: pioneering educators and celebrated trailblazers. The four individuals chosen were: Robley Dunglison (1798-1869), the first professor of medicine at UVA and personal physician to Thomas Jefferson; Thomas Harrison Hunter (1913-1997), Dean of the School of Medicine from 1953-1965 and longtime medical educator and leader at UVA; Vivian Winona Pinn (1941- ), 1967 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine and first Director of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health; and Walter Reed (1851-1902), 1869 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine famous for his role in discovering the vector for yellow fever.

To learn more about the individuals behind the names of the four colleges of the School of Medicine, stop by the lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, where an exhibit featuring these namesakes is currently on display. The exhibit includes photographs and artifacts from the Library’s collections and will remain up until June 2017. The exhibit was created by Emily Bowden of Historical Collections & Services.

 

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Publishing Workshop on April 10th

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writing-clipart-5When: Monday April 10, 2017
12:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Where: Health Sciences Library MILL (first floor)

A luncheon buffet will be available, so please register if you plan to attend: http://cal.hsl.virginia.edu/event/3189481

The Health Sciences Library is hosting Introduction to Scholarly Publishing: Navigating the Landscape, a workshop offering advice on everything from how the publishing process works to writing and submitting a manuscript. Topics to be covered will include:

•             Introduction to Scholarly Publishing
•             How to Get Published in Research Journals
•             Innovation in the Research and Publishing Landscape
•             Bibliometrics
•             Authors’ Rights and Responsibilities
•             Ethics in Publishing

The workshop will be led by George Woodward , Senior Publisher, Health & Medical Sciences from Elsevier and supported by a panel of UVa faculty members who are journal editors. George Woodward works on a portfolio of journals in nutrition and dermatology, and before joining Elsevier, he worked as a managing editor for two immunology journals. As part of his current job he presents to early-career researchers around the United States, providing an insider’s perspective on the publishing process and how to get the most out of it.

Questions? Contact Jonathan Lord, Head of Collection Development & Management, Health Sciences Library, jml4s@virginia.edu

 

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Anatomical Theatre Web Exhibit

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A new web exhibit from Historical Collections is now available!

The Anatomical Theatre at the University of Virginia

Detail of the Anatomical Theatre from View of the University … by E. Sachse & Co., 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Detail from View of the University… E. Sachse & Co., 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Some of you might remember the physical display about UVA’s Anatomical Theatre which was in the library lobby last year. Now, an expanded version has joined 34 other online exhibits hosted on the Historical Collections exhibits webpage.

While an anatomical theatre was not included in the earliest plans of the University, the need for one became clear before the first classes were held in 1825. Thomas Jefferson himself drew the design which included two floor plans, a front elevation view, and a cross section. The web exhibit documents the initial construction and traces later changes to the building into the first third of the twentieth century.

Photograph of the Anatomical Theatre by Atcheson Laughlin Hench, 1937. Prints07408, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

The exhibit also explores events surrounding the uses of the building. Through the letters of an early faculty member, John Staige Davis, the reader gets a glimpse of what anatomy professors in the nineteenth century did to procure “subjects” or cadavers so their medical students could perform dissections. Davis described arrangements with “resurrectionists” or body snatchers who frequented the cemeteries of the poor and the enslaved. Letters were also written to request the bodies of those sentenced to death, as when Davis asked for those “Convicts awaiting execution,” referring to men who were to be hung for their participation in John Brown’s raid at Harpers Ferry.

Wish you could visit this Jeffersonian building? Sadly, that is no longer possible as it was demolished in 1939 following the construction of Alderman Library. However, a generous number of images in the exhibit illustrate the Theatre’s location, appearance, and demise.

The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library houses many of the photographs, the John Staige Davis papers, and numerous official University of Virginia documents which were useful in telling the story of the Theatre. Janet Pearson from Historical Collections wrote The Anatomical Theatre at the University of Virginia, but the initial spark for the exhibit came from the late M.C. Wilhelm, M.D.

Blog post written by Janet Pearson.

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