New Exhibit: Fever Charts

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The history of yellow fever dates back to the 1600s when the first recorded outbreaks occurred in the Caribbean. In the centuries that followed, researchers and physicians sought to understand and combat this deadly disease. Early theories about yellow fever attributed its transmission to “contagious air,” meteorological phenomena, and microbes. Significant advances were made around 1900 when the U.S. Army invested heavily in yellow fever research and established the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission. The Commission was led by Walter Reed, a major in the U.S. Army who received his medical degree from the University of Virginia in 1869. Reed and his team would ultimately confirm the vector for yellow fever: a species of mosquito known as Aedes aegypti.

A new exhibit, Fever Charts: Data Visualization and the History of Yellow Fever Research, now on display in the lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, examines data visualizations used throughout many years of yellow fever research and explores their depictions of scientific insights, dead-ends, false positives, and dramatic discoveries. The maps and graphs tell a story as compelling as that of Walter Reed and the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission. They demonstrate the power of organized information and show that even the best-designed visualizations can be uninformative (or even disinformative) when applied to confounded or statistically questionable claims.

Fever Charts was designed and researched by VP Nagraj, Research Data Analyst at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, with support from Dan Cavanaugh and Emily Bowden of Historical Collections & Services. The exhibit draws on unique historical materials from the Library’s Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection. It will be on display from November 14, 2016 until February 2017.

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New eBook – Vital Signs: Core Metrics for Health & Health Care Progress

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indexVital Signs explores the most important issues – healthier people, better quality care, affordable care, and engaged individuals and communities – and specifies a streamlined set of 15 core measures. These measures, if standardized and applied at national, state, local, and institutional levels across the country, will transform the effectiveness, efficiency, and burden of health measurement and help accelerate focus and progress on our highest health priorities. Vital Signs also describes the leadership and activities necessary to refine, apply, maintain, and revise the measures over time, as well as how they can improve the focus and utility of measures outside the core set. – publisher information

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October is American Archives Month

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American Archives Month 2016 banner

American Archives Month 2016. Banner designed by Kimberley R. Barker

 

American Archives Month is a time to promote the work of archivists and celebrate archival collections around the country. From the National Archives in Washington, D.C., to local historical societies, institutions large and small use this month to highlight their mission and the materials they collect and preserve.

Historical Collections & Services at the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library maintains collections of rare books, photographs, and artifacts, in addition to serving as the permanent repository for historical records pertaining to the UVA Health System. In our archival collections you will find reports, newsletters, images, correspondence, and other documents that trace the history of health care and medical education at UVA back to the opening of the Hospital in 1901 and the University’s first course in medicine in 1825.

Featured in the Archives Month graphic above are three images from our collections: an illustration from the largest volume in our rare books collection, Bernhard Siegfried Albinus’ 1749 Tables of the Skelton and Muscles of the Human Body; a page from a 1633 herbal, a type of book that describes plants and details their medical properties; and a photograph of Walter Reed, leader of the U.S. Army Yellow Fever Commission, from the Library’s Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection. These and other early anatomy illustrations, rare medical texts, and unique manuscripts holdings are available at the Health Sciences Library for research and educational purposes.

Equally important to our continued stewardship of these rare historical items is the work being done to preserve for future researchers and historians the records of today, which often come in the challenging form of electronic documents and data. A concentrated effort is underway to collect and maintain materials that will record 21st century activities and accomplishments of the Health System for years to come.

The Historical Collections & Services webpage is a great place to learn more and explore our collections. For questions or additional information about archives, contact Dan Cavanaugh, Alvin V. and Nancy Baird Curator of Historical Collections, or Emily Bowden, Historical Collections Specialist.

 

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Library Director Gretchen Arnold, on National Medical Librarians Month

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Celebrate National Medical Librarians Month!

Celebrate National Medical Librarians Month!

 

October is National Medical Librarians Month. The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library is part of a national network of medical libraries, which includes the National Library of Medicine (part of the National Institutes of Health). All medical libraries have the goal of bringing the best quality information to users wherever they are and around the clock because that is how healthcare operates.
Here in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, we appreciate the importance of using the latest technologies but also understand that a human touch is important, too. That is why we place such value on our service ethic. We want every student, clinician, and staff member to have an excellent experience no matter what the need. Every day we work to ensure that our services and resources are aligned to the mission of the Health System which means we are doing all that we can to support the important patient care and research you do. It is a great time to be a librarian!

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New Exhibit: Civil War Medicine

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Life and Limb PosterLife and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War, a traveling exhibit from the National Library of Medicine, is now on display in the main lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. The American Civil War is a fascinating time in the history of medicine: a time of significant developments in anesthesia, modern surgery, and sanitation practices, but, simultaneously, a time of horrific injuries, widespread disease, frequent infections, and limited medical care.

Tracing the story from the horrors of war to the plight of veterans after its end, six exhibit panels discuss trauma experienced on the battlefield, the medical care soldiers received, and the recovery and hardships that followed. Accompanying the panels are 19th century books and artifacts from the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library’s Historical Collections.

To browse the exhibit online and view additional digital content, visit the web exhibition of Life and Limb. The exhibit will be at the Health Sciences Library until the first week of November 2016. For questions or comments, contact Historical Collections & Services.

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The Library welcomes Clinical Librarian

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The Library is pleased to welcome Elaine Attridge as our Clinical Librarian! Elaine obtained her Master’s in Library Science from the University of Pittsburgh, having been drawn to libraries from a very young age as a way to satisfy her curiosity about everything. She decided to pursue librarianship as a career after the Internet became mainstream in the 1990’s, as it was obvious to her that technology would evolve and greatly impact the field. This interviewer sat down with Elaine to learn more about her professional and personal interests.

Photo of Elaine Attridge, Clinical Librarian

Elaine Attridge, Clinical Librarian

To date, what’s been the most interesting professional project of which you’ve been a part?

There have been so many! I really enjoyed working with the School of Nursing as they developed their curriculum to include understanding and finding evidence based literature.

What about your position interested you enough to apply for it?

My current position piqued my interest because of the opportunity to work with the service centers and administration to improve quality and safety for our patients and employees. To be successful, I know I will utilize my traditional librarian skills, but I also see the chance to develop new roles for librarians that will hopefully be very relevant to the Health System. This is a new position and I’m really excited to see where it takes us!

What are you most looking forward to in your work here?

Working with a variety of colleagues throughout the Health System and finding ways to support their information needs; I get to learn something new every day!

What do you do for fun?

I really love to travel with my family! We recently returned from Iceland and I have my eye on Cuba. Exercise such as pilates, lifting, and sculling is also important to me. If you catch me at home, you’ll probably find me listening to Alt Nation or NPR podcasts or heading out to target shoot. I also enjoy my volunteer work with CASA and in my children’s schools.

What else should we know about you?

I have three children ages 9, 12, and 18 who are incredibly fun in completely different ways. Like all parents, I spend a lot of time in the car driving them to their activities.

On a completely random note, I have lived in Virginia for most of my life, but consider myself an honorary New Yorker. Oh, and one other thing: Some find it “interesting” that I am a vegetarian — who occasionally eats sausage or a bacon-wrapped date.

(And this last question, because the interviewer appreciates whimsy, as well as a twist ending)

Voldemort vs. Gandalf: who would lose?

Both. I think the most powerful wizards are in Washington.

A bold statement, Elaine. Very bold indeed. Welcome, we’re happy that you’re here!

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Welcome to our new Metadata Librarian!

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The Health Sciences Library is excited to welcome Abbey Heflin as our new Metadata Librarian!

A photo of Abbey Heflin, Metadata Librarian

Abbey Heflin, Metadata Librarian

Abbey completed her Master’s of Science in Library and Information Science at Drexel University, having been drawn to the field by both the changes happening in it due to the Information Age, and by the many ways that librarians can use their specialized skills to assist those in other disciplines.

I sat down with Abbey to learn more about her professional and personal interests:

To date, what’s been the most interesting professional project of which you’ve been a part?
The most interesting project I have been a part of so far has been a massive weeding project. It was interesting to me because it sparked a lot of attention from the faculty and gave the library a lot of opportunities to collaborate with them to rebuild a more useful collection for the students. It also was very neat because we were able to take down a lot of shelving and create more study and group study space, and the students loved it! Seeing our patron count increase over the course of the project (which was over two years) and their positive response to what we were doing was very heartwarming!

What about this position interested you enough to apply for it?
I had visited the HSL before, so I knew it was an innovative and progressive place. That is what interested me the most! I also was very excited to apply for my position because of my experience with technical services in libraries. This seemed like the perfect position to grow my professional skills as well as be a part of redefining the profession.

What are you most looking forward to in your work here?
I am really looking forward to working with the Health System and clinical teams to enhance patient education. I think that this is a great example of how librarians can assist other professionals and redefine how the library is perceived.

What do you do for fun?
I spend a lot of my free time visiting with family. I also like to run, read, and go boating.

What else should we know about you?
I am a dog freak! I love dogs! I have two of my own, Rags and Griffin. Rags is a Cairn Terrier like ToTo from “The Wizard of Oz” and Griffin is a Chesapeake Bay Retriever. I call them my babies and I spoil them rotten.

(And this last question, because the interviewer appreciates whimsy, as well as a twist ending)

In a rap battle between Grumpy Cat and Doug the Pug, who would win? I would have to say Grumpy Cat would win. She seems like she is really quick on her comebacks so I think she could battle pretty well!

The interviewer agrees with you: unlike Grumpy Cat, Doug the Pug lacks the predatory instincts necessary to triumph Welcome, Abbey, we’re glad that you’re here!

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New Funding Discovery Tools for Researchers

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Pivot logoGrantForward logo

 

 

 

 

All faculty, staff, and students at UVA now have access to two new funding discovery tools, Pivot and GrantForward. These tools allow researchers to locate funding opportunities based on their individual research interests.  Both Pivot and GrantForward allow researchers to create personalized searches and email alerts that target current and future funding opportunities.

Where to Get Help?

The Health Sciences Library has developed a series of workshops on funding discovery tools. The schedule for these workshops is as follows:

Can’t make it to a workshop?  Schedule a consultation with a librarian and we will help you set up an account, and create a saved search that will send the most relevant funding opportunities to your email.

https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/content/consultations

Additional Resources

The VPR Office is very interested in hearing feedback on these tools – please feel free to email Jeff Fox (jeff.fox@virginia.edu) with any feedback.

 

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Anatomy Textbooks Now Available Online

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The Library is now providing online access to several anatomy, embryology and histology textbooks that are widely used throughout the medical school curriculum. The books are licensed for an unlimited number of users and can be accessed from either on or off grounds.

Moore

Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 7th Edition © 2014 by Keith L. Moore

neuroanatomy

Neuroanatomy in Clinical Context: An Atlas of Structures, Sections, Systems, and Syndromes, 9th Edition © 2015 by Duane E. Haines, Ph.D.

Grant's Atlas

Grant’s Atlas of Anatomy, 14th Edition © 2017 by Anne M.R. Agur, Arthur F. Dalley II

Grant's Dissector

Grant’s Dissector, 16th Edition © 2017 by Alan J. Detton

Histology 7th edition

Histology: A Text and Atlas with Correlated Cell and Molecular Biology, Seventh Edition © 2016 by Michael H. Ross, PhD and Wojciech Pawlina

langman

Langman’s Medical Embryology, 13th Edition © 2015 by T.W. Sadler, Ph.D.

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Publishing Case Reports

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bmj-case-reports-slider

BMJ Case Reports is a newly available and fee-free option for publishing clinically interesting and/or educationally valuable case reports.

What is BMJ Case Reports?
BMJ Case Reports is an award winning journal that delivers a focused, peer-reviewed, valuable collection of cases in all disciplines so that healthcare professionals, researchers and others can easily find clinically important information on common and rare conditions. This is the largest single collection of case reports online with more than 11,000 articles from over 70 countries. BMJ Case Reports is indexed in Medline/PubMed, CINAHL, and Scopus. All published articles are deposited with PubMed Central.

What sort of case can I submit?
BMJ Case Reports is interested in cases that have educational value – novelty or rarity are not important. For further information, see: What cases do we want to publish?

Where can I submit cases?
You can submit your cases online at: Manuscript Central BMJ Case Reports. First time users need to create an account before submitting their articles. All case reports should be written using BMJ Case Reports Word templates; this expedites the peer review and publication process. Please read the Instructions for authors to help you prepare your case.

Is there a cost?
No.  The University of Virginia has paid for an institutional fellowship which allows all faculty, staff and students to submit as many cases as you like, access all the published material, and to re-use any published material for personal use and teaching without further permission, at no cost to the individual. Authors should use this institutional fellowship code when submitting their case reports: 567181

When will my case be published?
Cases are published every week following a copy editing and final author approval process. To keep up to date with the review and publication process, you can sign up for weekly email alerts.

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