New Browser Extension to Access Free Articles

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Unpaywall is a browser extension to legally access free articles.  Available for Chrome and Firefox, Unpaywall searches thousands of open-access repositories worldwide, including PubMed Central, the DOAJ, Crossref, DataCite, Google Scholar, and BASE.

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Transplant Interest Group, others, to sponsor organ donation events

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A week-long series of events are planned for April 21-27.

A week-long series of events are planned for April 21-27.

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The Four Colleges of the UVA School of Medicine

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Today each medical student at UVA is assigned to one of four colleges within the School of Medicine: Dunglison College, Hunter College, Pinn College, and Reed College, but this system is a relatively new practice at UVA. Of the 123 students who attended the first session of the University of Virginia in 1825, 26 registered for courses in medicine and anatomy. Over the last nearly 200 years, medical education at UVA has steadily expanded, and, in 2016, there were 621 medical students enrolled in the UVA School of Medicine. In addition to increased class size, other 21st century changes to the medical school have included the opening of the new Claude Moore Medical Education Building and the debut of a revised medical curriculum. In response to these expansions, and in order to preserve close student-faculty relationships, four colleges were created within the UVA School of Medicine. The four college system was launched in 2010, each college with its own Dean for Student Affairs responsible for providing support and mentorship to his or her college’s students.

Robley Dunglison, 1865, F. Gutekunst, Philadelphia, PA, Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine; Thomas Harrison Hunter, circa 1953, Prints20709, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA; Walter Reed, 1901, Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection, MS-1, 087/38, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA; Vivian W. Pinn, 2007, Prints22019, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA.

Clockwise from top left: Robley Dunglison, 1865, Image courtesy of the National Library of Medicine; Thomas Harrison Hunter, circa 1953, Prints20709, Historical Collections & Services; Walter Reed, 1901, Philip S. Hench Walter Reed Yellow Fever Collection, MS-1, 087/38, Historical Collections & Services; Vivian W. Pinn, 2007, Prints22019, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, UVA.

Four distinguished physicians associated with the history of the School of Medicine were selected to represent the four colleges, each serving as that college’s namesake. These namesakes consist of two UVA faculty members and two School of Medicine alumni: pioneering educators and celebrated trailblazers. The four individuals chosen were: Robley Dunglison (1798-1869), the first professor of medicine at UVA and personal physician to Thomas Jefferson; Thomas Harrison Hunter (1913-1997), Dean of the School of Medicine from 1953-1965 and longtime medical educator and leader at UVA; Vivian Winona Pinn (1941- ), 1967 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine and first Director of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health; and Walter Reed (1851-1902), 1869 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine famous for his role in discovering the vector for yellow fever.

To learn more about the individuals behind the names of the four colleges of the School of Medicine, stop by the lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, where an exhibit featuring these namesakes is currently on display. The exhibit includes photographs and artifacts from the Library’s collections and will remain up until June 2017. The exhibit was created by Emily Bowden of Historical Collections & Services.

 

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Publishing Workshop on April 10th

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writing-clipart-5When: Monday April 10, 2017
12:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Where: Health Sciences Library MILL (first floor)

A luncheon buffet will be available, so please register if you plan to attend: http://cal.hsl.virginia.edu/event/3189481

The Health Sciences Library is hosting Introduction to Scholarly Publishing: Navigating the Landscape, a workshop offering advice on everything from how the publishing process works to writing and submitting a manuscript. Topics to be covered will include:

•             Introduction to Scholarly Publishing
•             How to Get Published in Research Journals
•             Innovation in the Research and Publishing Landscape
•             Bibliometrics
•             Authors’ Rights and Responsibilities
•             Ethics in Publishing

The workshop will be led by George Woodward , Senior Publisher, Health & Medical Sciences from Elsevier and supported by a panel of UVa faculty members who are journal editors. George Woodward works on a portfolio of journals in nutrition and dermatology, and before joining Elsevier, he worked as a managing editor for two immunology journals. As part of his current job he presents to early-career researchers around the United States, providing an insider’s perspective on the publishing process and how to get the most out of it.

Questions? Contact Jonathan Lord, Head of Collection Development & Management, Health Sciences Library, jml4s@virginia.edu

 

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Anatomical Theatre Web Exhibit

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A new web exhibit from Historical Collections is now available!

The Anatomical Theatre at the University of Virginia

Detail of the Anatomical Theatre from View of the University … by E. Sachse & Co., 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Detail from View of the University… E. Sachse & Co., 1856. Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

Some of you might remember the physical display about UVA’s Anatomical Theatre which was in the library lobby last year. Now, an expanded version has joined 34 other online exhibits hosted on the Historical Collections exhibits webpage.

While an anatomical theatre was not included in the earliest plans of the University, the need for one became clear before the first classes were held in 1825. Thomas Jefferson himself drew the design which included two floor plans, a front elevation view, and a cross section. The web exhibit documents the initial construction and traces later changes to the building into the first third of the twentieth century.

Photograph of the Anatomical Theatre by Atcheson Laughlin Hench, 1937. Prints07408, Special Collections, University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va.

The exhibit also explores events surrounding the uses of the building. Through the letters of an early faculty member, John Staige Davis, the reader gets a glimpse of what anatomy professors in the nineteenth century did to procure “subjects” or cadavers so their medical students could perform dissections. Davis described arrangements with “resurrectionists” or body snatchers who frequented the cemeteries of the poor and the enslaved. Letters were also written to request the bodies of those sentenced to death, as when Davis asked for those “Convicts awaiting execution,” referring to men who were to be hung for their participation in John Brown’s raid at Harpers Ferry.

Wish you could visit this Jeffersonian building? Sadly, that is no longer possible as it was demolished in 1939 following the construction of Alderman Library. However, a generous number of images in the exhibit illustrate the Theatre’s location, appearance, and demise.

The Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library houses many of the photographs, the John Staige Davis papers, and numerous official University of Virginia documents which were useful in telling the story of the Theatre. Janet Pearson from Historical Collections wrote The Anatomical Theatre at the University of Virginia, but the initial spark for the exhibit came from the late M.C. Wilhelm, M.D.

Blog post written by Janet Pearson.

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Meet the Author of “Flatlining: How Healthcare Could Kill the U.S. Economy”

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flatliningLIVE BROADCAST THURSDAY MARCH 16, 2017  2:00 – 2:30 PM

Issues surrounding healthcare – and the ways to improve it — are constantly in the news, more so now than in recent memory. With a changing political climate in Washington, and across the country, lawmakers on all sides are trying to figure out the best course of action to address this critical issue. “Flatlining: How Healthcare Could Kill the U.S. Economy” takes these issues head on, with a mission to provide a deeper understanding of the health industry.

Join Ron Howrigon, author of “Flatlining: How Healthcare Could Kill the U.S. Economy” to learn more about this important issue.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

This free webinar is sponsored by Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.

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Projection Now Available in Detmer Room

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The Detmer Room in the after hours space of the library has become a popular meeting place for our Health System patrons.  To meet the needs of patrons who wish to project something when using the room, we recently purchased a smart TV.  A Service Desk team member will deliver the TV to the room, when requested.

Please contact the Service Desk at 924-5444 if you would like to reserve the room or if you have any questions.

IMG_5180

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Cancer: The Road Ahead

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cancer

The journal Cell has just published a special issue entitled “Cancer: The Road Ahead.” In it, the Cell editorial team writes:

“Fighting cancer has been the life mission for generations of biologists and clinicians, and to this effort we dedicate this issue of Cell. This reviews issue highlights the converging paths in cancer research that are enabling changes in clinical treatment and removing obstacles between patients in need and access to effective care. Empowered by these breakthroughs, it is possible to imagine major gains against cancer’s relentless advance.”   Cell 168(4), 9 February 2017, Pages 545–546

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#ColorOurCollections

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ColorOurCollectionsThis week marks the second annual #ColorOurCollections event! #ColorOurCollections is a project launched last year by the New York Academy of Medicine Library. Inspired in part by the recent popularity of coloring books (even among adults!), #ColorOurCollections strives to take advantage of the great coloring content that can be found in special collections held by libraries, archives, and other cultural institutions around the world. Last year over 200 institutions joined in the fun by sharing images from their collections and encouraging users to unleash their inner creativity. On ColorOurCollections.org you can find and download hundreds of coloring pages taken from everything from children’s classics to botanical texts, anatomical atlases, university yearbooks, and much more!

Coloring sheets

Look for coloring sheets just inside the lobby of the CMHSL, near the top of the staircase.

The Claude Moore Health Sciences Library is excited to offer a “coloring book” this year featuring 8 images from our collections. The images are from volumes of Galen (from 1537), Avicenna (1527), Gerard (1633), and Culpeper (1807-1810), and from an early 20th century Virginia public health publication. Coloring sheets can be downloaded in PDF form (Click to download: Claude Moore Health Sciences Library-Coloring Pages-2017.PDF) and are also available through our Facebook page. Print copies will be available in the Library as well. Be creative and have fun! And after you’ve created your masterpiece, we’d love to see it! Upload your colorings to social media with the hashtag #ColorOurCollections (on Facebook if you tag us in your post @historical.collections or @uvahsl we’ll be sure to see it!) Questions about #ColorOurCollections? Contact Emily Bowden in Historical Collections at eab3w@virginia.edu

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New Exhibit: Frankenstein and the Secrets of Nature

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Frankenstein Exhibit PosterToday Frankenstein’s reputation as a “monster story” has perhaps partially eclipsed the rich history of scientific inquiry, medical progress, and social evolution that underlies the text. Frankenstein was published in 1818, a time when a strong sense of scientific curiosity permeated academic circles and the general public alike. Popular topics of interest included understanding the so-called “secrets of nature” and probing the elusive boundary between life and death. Scientists and physicians sought to better understand the definition of life through the study of human anatomy and physiology, dissections of other organisms, experiments involving electricity, and other medical and scientific investigations, such as attempts to resuscitate victims of drownings. Author Mary Shelley was among those fascinated by this pursuit of “the secrets of nature,” an interest clearly reflected in her novel Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus. From Victor Frankenstein’s fervent efforts in his laboratory to the monster’s musings on the essential properties of life, the book poses profound questions about science, ethics, and society.

Frankenstein Exhibit

Frankenstein exhibit on display in the lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

A new travelling exhibit that examines these intersecting subjects is now on display in the lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. Frankenstein: Penetrating the Secrets of Nature was developed and produced by the National Library of Medicine; the exhibit explores the life of author Mary Shelley, her remarkable novel, and the defining era of scientific inquiry and social change in which it was written. An online version of the exhibit with additional digital content can be found on the website of the National Library of Medicine. The exhibit will be at the Health Sciences Library until March 24, 2017. Accompanying the exhibit panels are anatomy texts from the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library’s rare books collection and 19th century instruments from the Library’s medical artifacts collection. For questions or comments, contact Historical Collections & Services.

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