Lactation Room Now Available

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The Library is pleased to announce its newly-designated lactation space. This is a private, lockable room in the Cabell Room and is available during regular library hours.  Those wishing to use the room should show their Health System ID at the Service Desk to check out the key. Thanks to Lactation Consultants Katie Heck and Diane Sampson for their assistance in preparing the space.   For more information, please email Kimberley Barker (Kimberley@virginia.edu) or contact the Service Desk at 434-924-5444.

You can also call the Service Desk in advance to see if the room is being used.

IPA Open House on April 12th

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The Library is excited to announce that the BioConnector is partnering with the University of Virginia Health System Cancer Center and the Office of Research Core Administration  to provide access to Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). IPA is software that allows users to rapidly understand pathway involvement and change, effected biological processes, causal regulators and their directional effect on genes, and functions and diseases across multiple time points or doses.

IPA logo

Intrigued? Then make plans to visit the Library during the IPA Open House on April 12th. This is your opportunity to learn more, to try IPA for free, and to learn about the subsidized pricing available to you through UVA.

There are several sessions from which to choose:

9:00-10:00- Sign up session; BioConnector ( lower level, Health Sciences Library)
Learn more about IPA, and sign up for an account.
Coffee & refreshments will be served.

10:00-noon- Introduction and hands-on training (Carter Classroom, Health Sciences Library)
*Registration is required for this session: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/node/38716

1:00-4:00- Drop-in session

We hope that you can join us.

Celebrating 40 years of service!

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On April 9, 1976, the opening of the new Health Sciences Library at the University of Virginia was celebrated at a dedication ceremony. This year on April 8, 2016, we recognize the Health Sciences Library’s 40th anniversary, marking four decades of service in the current library building.

 

Early images of the Health Sciences Library, clockwise from top left: concept drawing for the new Health Sciences Library, c. 1970; exterior of the HSL, c. 1976; students in the HSL, c. 1980; entrance to the renamed Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, 1981. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

Early images of the Health Sciences Library, clockwise from top left: concept drawing for the new Health Sciences Library, c. 1970; exterior of the HSL, c. 1976; students in the HSL, c. 1980; entrance to the renamed Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, 1981. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

 

The early history of the Health Sciences Library goes back to the very beginning of the University and a modest collection of medical, anatomical, and surgical texts, including 329 works selected by Thomas Jefferson. For nearly a century, medical books were kept with the rest of the library collection housed in the Rotunda. Unfortunately, most of these medical texts were destroyed during the 1895 Rotunda fire. As the Rotunda and the library collection were rebuilt in the years that followed, a new medical library of 7,000 books was acquired and housed in the basement of the Rotunda, separate from the rest of the collection.

In 1910, Abraham Flexner’s famous report on medical education in the United States and Canada commented that one of the primary deficiencies of the UVA medical program was the lack of an adequate medical library. Nearly two decades later, the construction of the new UVA medical school, which opened in 1929, met this need by allocating space for a designated medical library. However, the rapid expansion of the library’s collection of books and journals and the swift growth of both the School of Medicine and the University Hospital caused the library to outgrow its new space much sooner than expected. Beginning in the 1940s, storage limitations led many medical books and library materials to be stored in Alderman Library or in other offsite locations like the attic of Cabell Hall. A need for additional library space was becoming increasingly apparent, but the struggle to obtain the funds needed to develop and build a new library would stretch on for several more decades.

 

The Health Sciences Library in 1980 and 2006. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

The Health Sciences Library in 1980 and 2006. Images courtesy of Historical Collections & Services, CMHSL, UVA.

 

Finally in the early 1960s, generous donations by alumni, a grant from the National Institutes of Health, and state funding provided the necessary capital to launch a planning committee for the new library. Leading these efforts was Dr. Wilhelm Moll, director of the library from 1962 until his death in 1979. In recognition of Dr. Moll’s leadership and substantial contributions to the medical library, the Wilhelm Moll Rare Book and Medical History Room in Historical Collections was named in his honor.

Re-envisioned as the “Health Sciences Library,” the new facility designed under Dr. Moll’s supervision would bring together the medical collection and the nursing collection, which had been held in a separate nursing library in McKim Hall, and would adopt the mission to serve patrons from all areas of the health system. Project leaders hoped to select a site for the new library that would position it at the heart of the medical center complex, adjacent to education, research, and medical care facilities. An innovative design was proposed for a library building that would span Jefferson Park Avenue, serving as a “bridge” between health system buildings on either side of the street. After much debate, and despite lingering apprehension from some community members, the “skybridge” design was approved. Construction began in 1973 and was completed for a grand opening of the new library on August 8, 1975. Two years later the library acquired the name we know it by today after the reception of a gift by radiologist and UVA alumnus Dr. Claude Moore.

Over the last 40 years of the Health Sciences Library’s history, the library has experienced tremendous collection growth, embraced the advent of new technologies and digital resources, and completed a major renovation project from 1999-2000 to create a new journal room, computer lab, updated entry foyer and service desk, group study rooms, and expanded Historical Collections area. Just last year the Library opened a satellite unit, the Patient & Family Library, in the UVA Hospital’s main lobby. In 2016 the library continues its mission to support education, research, patient care, and community service at the UVA Health System, serving as a leader in the creation, organization, sharing, and preservation of biomedical knowledge. Help us celebrate this 40 year milestone at a celebration Friday, April 8, 2016, at 12:30 pm in the main lobby of the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

New E-Books

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WoundThe newly published books listed below have recently been added to the Library’s collection of electronic books. Click on any linked title to browse a table of contents or to read the full-text. A more comprehensive list of health sciences e-books available can be found on the Library’s E-Books page. Do you want to recommend the purchase of a book for the Library’s collection? You can submit your requests via our online Purchase Recommendation form.

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New Quick Access iPad Kiosks

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IMG_4119To meet the needs of our patrons with a busy schedule, we have installed two quick access iPad kiosks in the lobby.  The iPads can be used to check email, Facebook, or to look up a website.

Additional Booths Available in CMHSL Lobby

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We added more booths to the lobby, as this area has become a popular space for patrons to study and collaborate.  Two mobile whiteboards are also available.

Evidence-Based Practice for Nurses at UVA

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The UVA Professional Nursing Staff Organization (PNSO) supports and encourages evidence-based practice (EBP) to improve care and achieve excellent outcomes throughout the institution. Nurses are empowered to make a difference at UVA Health System by adopting an evidence-based approach to their practice. To help facilitate this process, the Health Sciences Library has developed an Evidence-Based Nursing Page: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/portal/sonursing/ebn.cfm

This resource contains information about searching our specialized EBP databases and resources. Nurses understand that the evolving information landscape requires them to develop information management skills in order to address the many questions that arise in their education, practice, and research, and the Library is instrumental in collecting resources to aid in this development.

The Evidence Based Nursing page also contains a link to the Evidence-Based Practice Toolkit: https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/node/14254 , which describes the UVA Evidence-Based Practice Framework. This framework establishes a process for assessing and critiquing research, and incorporating and implementing validated research into nursing practice at UVA Health System. Any clinician may use the Evidence-Based Practice Template to submit a preliminary assessment of the evidence supporting a recommendation for practice change to the PNSO’s Research, Review, and Recommendation Committee (R3).

To facilitate collaborative use of the Template, the Library has developed an online Journal Club https://www.hsl.virginia.edu/journal-club-dashboard that follows the structure of the print resource but allows email discussion of the appraisal of individual journal articles.

In this technology-based health care world, nurses need skills and resources in order to find reliable information and the Health Sciences Library continues to be an integral partner in advancing nurses’ evidence-based practice at UVA.

Women’s History Month: Sara Ruth Dean

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On January 12, 1920, five months before the passage of the 19th amendment guaranteed U.S. women the right to vote, a meeting of the University of Virginia Board of Visitors included a revolutionary decision:

“RESOLVED by the Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia, that beginning with the session opening in September 1920, mature and properly qualified women be admitted to the graduate and professional schools of the University…” [1]

At the following meeting on February 19, 1920, the Board of Visitors composed age and education requirements for women applicants. For prospective female medical students, these criteria included being no younger than twenty years old on the date of registration and possessing at least two years of prior college work. [2] When the fall term began later that year, two women had been admitted to join the medical student ranks: Sara Ruth Dean of Mississippi and Lila Morse Bonner of South Carolina. Having already completed two years of study in medicine at the University of Mississippi, Dean would graduate from UVA just two years later in 1922, earning the distinction of being the first woman to graduate from the School of Medicine. In 1924, Bonner would become the second to do so.

Members of the faculty with the School of Medicine class of 1922, featuring Sara Ruth Dean in the second row from the top. Prints21251, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Members of the faculty with the School of Medicine class of 1922, featuring Sara Ruth Dean in the second row from the top. Prints21251, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Historical records in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library contain little information about Sara Ruth Dean during her time at UVA. Her name appears on the 1920-1921 and 1921-1922 medical student registers, and she is included among the list of graduates who received their diplomas on June 13, 1922. After obtaining her medical degree, Dr. Dean worked at children’s hospitals in Boston and Denver before returning to her hometown of Greenwood, Mississippi, where she established a private pediatrics practice in 1928. [3] Five year later, Dean’s career as a child specialist suffered a serious setback when she found herself making headlines around the nation as the central figure in a murder trial.

In 1933, the sudden death of another Greenwood physician, Dr. John Preston Kennedy, led to charges that Dean had fatally poisoned Kennedy with a mercury-laced cocktail. The highly publicized Dean-Kennedy case hinged on a deathbed accusation made by Kennedy to his brothers, love letters between Kennedy and Dean, and testimonials from several respected physicians disputing the mercury-poisoning diagnosis. After a lengthy trial during which Dean staunchly maintained her innocence, the 35-year-old doctor was convicted of Kennedy’s murder and sentenced to life imprisonment. She lost the appeal but then in July of 1935 received a full pardon from Mississippi Governor Sennett Conner.

While her involvement in a murder trial may have garnered far more attention during her lifetime, Dr. Dean’s legacy as the first woman to graduate from the School of Medicine marks an important milestone in the history of women at UVA. Soon after the arrival of female graduate and professional students, women began to be accepted in other areas of academic life at the University. Dr. Thelma F. Brumfield (later Dunn), herself a 1926 graduate of the UVA School of Medicine, became the first woman faculty member of the School of Medicine when she was hired by the Department of Bacteriology and Pathology in 1927.

 

Thelma F. Brumfield Dunn, 1929. Prints21268, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Thelma F. Brumfield Dunn, 1929. Prints21268, Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.

Despite the significance of these steps to open the doors of the School of Medicine to female students and faculty members, for many decades after 1920 women remained a very small minority at UVA and in the medical profession as well. Not until the mid-1970s would Title IX and shifting social perceptions spur a sharp rise in the number of women pursuing careers in medicine. Almost 100 years after the Board of Visitors first voted to admit female graduate students, and in honor of Women’s History Month, we remember some of the early figures who helped pave the way for women at the UVA School of Medicine.

1. Board of Visitors Minutes. (1920 January 12). University of Virginia.

2. Board of Visitors Minutes. (1920 February 19). University of Virginia.

3. Selected articles from The Greenwood Commonwealth. (1928-1934). University of Virginia School of Medicine Biographical Files, #MS-36, Box 2. Historical Collections & Services, Claude Moore Health Sciences Library.